Please DONATE with PayPal for Make Up Meeting
to help support our Service Projects.
SUGGEST Future Programs
 
Earlier this past year, Rotary announced that it has formalized its service partnership with the Peace Corps. As a member of Rotary E-Club of One World, you now have additional opportunities to connect with international and community service projects where you live.
 
Peace Corps, an independent U.S. federal agency, sends U/S. citizens abroad to help tackle the most pressing needs around the world while promoting international goodwill. Peace Corps Volunteers live and work alongside the people they support for a period of two or more years. They concentrate efforts to create sustainable change that lives on long after their period of in-country service. Peace Corps currently has volunteers in more than 60 countries.

"Today's announcement is particularly meaningful for me because I come from a family of Rotarians," said Peace Corps Acting Director, Carrie Hessler-Radelet, referring to her father, grandfather, and aunt. "We are eager to join together in common efforts to inspire volunteerism across the country and around the world."
 
At the signing of the agreement, Rotary International General Secretary John Hewko said, “It makes perfect sense to leverage the strengths of both organizations to achieve maximum impact, efficiency and sustainability in the projects we carry out. Together we will work to improve lives and build stronger communities, and – in doing so – address many of the root causes of violence and conflict, such as poverty, illiteracy, disease, and lack of access to clean water and sanitation.”
 
 
John Osterlund (far left) and Ron Burton watch as Peace Corps Acting Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet and Rotary International General Secretary John Hewko sign a letter of collaboration on a one-year pilot program in the Philippines, Thailand, and Togo.
Photo Credit: Rotary International/Alyce Henson
 
 
Since the organizations’ initial collaboration last year, the Peace Corps and Rotary have garnered thousands of dollars to support volunteer projects across the three pilot countries, including a clean water initiative in Togo, a book distribution project in Thailand and the construction of latrines and a learning center for students with disabilities in the Philippines.

Within the Philippines, Thailand, and Togo, Peace Corps posts and Rotary districts will coordinate at the country level with support from the headquarters of both organizations. Local Rotary clubs interested in working with Peace Corps volunteers should contact their district governors. Clubs located elsewhere should work through their Rotary counterparts in the pilot countries.

Rotary and Peace Corps have already cooperated on several international projects that have resulted in sustainable change in at least one of Rotary’s six areas of focus while enhancing goodwill and addressing major local community concerns. Peace Corps Volunteer Matt Hardwick organized local musicians and a production team to create this video about a smokeless cookstove project that two Returned Peace Corps Volunteers helped organize with the Denver LoDo Rotary Club.
 
(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Ec_BvhGXLfA)
 
 
 

There are number of former Peace Corps volunteers already in Rotary. They can be a significant resource as they offer a wealth of knowledge about a country’s government, culture and past service projects successes and mistakes. In their overseas assignment, they lived Rotary’s motto of “Service above Self”. 

Start the New Year out with a resolution to get more involved in Rotary. 

 

(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsAKgphvi8g)

 

 

 

Working with Peace Corps
 

Peace Corps, an independent U.S. federal agency, sends U.S. citizens abroad to help tackle the most pressing needs around the world while promoting better international understanding of American culture and enhancing global awareness. Peace Corps Volunteers live and work alongside the people they support for a period of two or more years and concentrate efforts to create sustainable change that lives on long after their period of in-country service. Peace Corps currently has volunteers in more than 60 countries.


While in service, each Peace Corps Volunteer is tasked with addressing one of the following sectors:

  •   Education
  •   Health
  •   Community Economic Development
  •   Environment
  •   Youth in Development
  •   Agriculture

These sectors align closely with Rotary’s areas of focus, which provide the framework for Rotary members’ work around the globe.  Learn more at http://www.peacecorps.gov/.
 

 

Why work with a Peace Corps Volunteer?
 

A Peace Corps Volunteer (PCV) offers access to local contacts, community development insights, and funding possibilities within a particular community. Involving a PCV in your project will increase its reach, impact, and sustainability.


Peace Corps Volunteers work with nongovernmental organizations, host-country governments, and local community members to identify and address local needs. PCVs can help you identify prospective beneficiaries and work with you to find the most effective way to address a community’s needs. They also can help oversee a project’s implementation, assist with training, and help you make arrangements with community members to ensure a project’s sustainability.


Rotary and Rotaract club projects are strengthened when clubs in different countries form an international partnership. Returned Peace Corps Volunteers often maintain relationships with their host community, Returned Peace Corps Volunteers can help connect clubs at home in the U.S. to ones with which they worked while abroad. Such links can lead to international Rotary partnerships that provide resources for projects in the host country.


How to work with a Peace Corps Volunteer
Peace Corps Volunteers live in the community they are helping, and are eager to meet with others who are invested in improving communities. To introduce Rotary to a Peace Corps Volunteer:

  •   Invite the volunteer to a club meeting or Rotary event.
  •   Invite the volunteer to visit a project your club has undertaken in your community.
  •   Invite the volunteer to make a presentation at a club meeting about his or her work and experiences in-country.
  •   Explore how the volunteer can serve as a cross-cultural liaison between the host club and existing or potential club project partners in the U.S.
  •   Ask for the volunteer’s assistance translating documents and communications from English into the local language.

To identify collaboration opportunities, check Peace Corps’ website for lists of countries where Peace Corps works. Even if a volunteer lives far from your club’s area, he or she still may be able to assist with contacts in your region.


Contact rotarypartnership@peacecorps.gov to connect with Peace Corps post in your country.


How to create a Rotary Community Corps in collaboration with Peace Corps Volunteers
Rotary Community Corps (RCCs) are made up of people who are not Rotary members but who work in partnership with Rotary clubs to improve their communities. Each RCC is sponsored by a Rotary club and acts as its partner in service.


Some RCCs are created for a specific project, while others tackle larger, entrenched problems on an ongoing basis. Each RCC sets its own goals based on its community’s specific needs. As representatives of the community being served, RCC members bring enthusiasm, creativity, and sustainability to the projects they help design and implement. They offer community solutions for community challenges. Work with the community’s Peace Corps Volunteer to determine whether a new RCC should be established to undertake project work and to ensure a project’s sustainability after the volunteer has returned home. Learn more about Rotary Community Corps.


How to work with Returned Peace Corps Volunteers
Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs), volunteers who’ve completed their service abroad and have returned to the U.S. often maintain strong relationships with their host communities and with the local Rotary or Rotaract clubs. To introduce your club to a Return Peace Corps Volunteer:

  •   Contact a Peace Corps Regional Recruitment Office to connect with the local RPCV alumni network in your region
  •   Invite a returned volunteer to attend your club meeting or a Rotary event.
  •   Invite a returned volunteer to make a presentation about his or her work abroad and, if applicable, ask about how he or she worked with local Rotary or Rotaract clubs.
  •   Ask a returned volunteer to facilitate an introduction to the Rotary or Rotaract clubs with which he or she worked while abroad.
  •   Invite a returned volunteer to use his or her community development expertise to assist your club with its projects.

 

Please share your thoughts below.

 

 

 
Please DONATE with PayPal for Make Up Meeting
to help support our Service Projects.
SUGGEST Future Programs

 

 
 
Website Sponsors