Why is the "Four Way Test" so Hard to Remember?

We all know the "Four Way Test,"... or do we? Why is it that new members and sometimes even the most senior Rotarians fumble when asked to recite this basic tenet of Rotary? How is it that these intelligent men and women stumble over just a few simple words? I suggest that there is much more to this than simply not remembering four sentences.

Consider this: the 24 words of the Rotary Four Way Test are not just about truthful, fair and beneficial actions involving goodwill towards our friends and associates. Actually, they are all about promises.


Please watch this 9 minute video summarizing the role of the Four Way Test in life.Promises, when they are truthful and welcomed, are like beautiful gifts. But, promises can also just be mundane agreements to take some particular action. We make both kinds of promises every day of our lives; promises to our spouses, to our children, to our coworkers, and to our fellow Rotarians. What is essential to remember is that each promise we make is a tiny expression of our personal worth, of what we stand for, our word given without qualifiers, a firm bond that we create between ourselves and others.

 

 

NEXT, PLEASE ANSWER THIS QUESTION BEFORE READING ON


Answer: No, of course not. Many people often say, "I'll try to do that." It's a very common phrase. Now that you have watched this video review of the Four Way Test, pleas

e answer this question: 
When you say, "I'll try to do that," what exactly do you mean?
When you say that, are you making a promise?

What "I'll try to do that" really means is this: "I don't have it in my heart to say 'No' to you, and I don't think I can, or want to, and I just don't have the time to do what you ask, so I can't give you my true promise."

 

How sad it would be if we were to go through life saying only, "I'll try," or breaking the only real promises that we make. When we just say, "I'll try," a promise is stillborn, no beautiful gift is given, and no bond of our word created.

 

So now we can see why the Four Way Test is so hard to remember. It is hard to remember because it contains four very serious and significant promises. It contains words which trump "I'll try," words which if taken seriously, would require each of us to make and respect all of our promises. Not just those to other Rotarians, but those promises we make to all with whom we come in contact. The four promises implicit in the Four Way Test are:

I will speak truth to you.
I will be fair to you.
I will treat you with goodwill and friendship.
And, what I do will be beneficial to both you and me.

Those are the four very powerful promises contained in the Four Way Test. There is no room for "I'll try" here. As Rotarians, it must become our goal to make the Four Way Test a real and significant part of not only our business, but also our lives. Then and only then will we easily remember the Four Way Test.

 

NEXT, A PROMISE OUR eClub One World NEEDS TO KEEP


At the beginning of every Rotary year (July 1st, 2013), our club sets its promised goals for fundraising. This year we promised to raise $2,200 for the Annual Fund. So far, we have only raised $1,400 and we only have two months to go! Can you help by donating any amount? Even as little as $10, or $100, or any much larger amount! Our goal is to be recognized as anEvery Rotarian, Every Year Club. If you have not already made a contribution this year, a donation of any amount, large or small, will help your club to accomplish that goal.

To contribute, just mail a check made out to The Rotary Foundation to our Foundation Chair, Allan Pacela, at P.O. Box 1040, Solvang, CA 93464, U.S.A. and he will see to it that your donation is properly recorded. Any amount will count towards our goal and will also give you credit towards an eventual Paul Harris Fellowship too. Your contribution to the Annual Fund not only makes Rotary's International work possible, but also comes back to us three years later at the District level for grants.

 

HOW THE FOUR WAY TEST INFLUENCES YOUTH, LEADERSHIP, AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Aaron Woody, a young student from Tennessee in Dist. 6780, learned both about leadership and how the Four Way Test can be applied to news and the media … applied from the journalism methods of yesterday, to the leaders of today, to the Facebook postings of tomorrow. He saw how the technique of "card stacking," which creates biased news, could be negated by social media. He learned how he could personally use the Four Way Test and how it is actually changing the world. Worth watching! Under five minutes.

 

FINALLY, JUST FOR FUN

Believe it or not, the Four Way Test has also become a "sing-along" song. Watch and listen to this two minute video … just for fun.

4 Way Test Rotary Singalong: 2:42 min:

 

Thank you for attending this weekly program of our eClub One World, District 5240!

AFTER VIEWING PLEASE RETURN TO HOMEPAGE TO REGISTER YOUR ATTENDANCE AND TO  MAKE A DONATION

 
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