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Classification Talk - Dr. Nabil Bedewi
 
As a new member of the Rotary E-Club of One World, I wondered how I could get to know everyone in the club.  In order to do that, we are kicking off “Classification Talks” to learn more about our members around the world.  This first  Classification Talk features our Webmaster, Dr. Nabil Bedewi, from Potomac, Maryland.  Nabil’s extremely interesting talk is a bit longer than average, but after all, he is a retired college professor.  smiley
 

This Tiny Country Feeds The World
By Frank Viviano
Photographs by Luca Locatelli
 
(This story appears in the September 2017 issue of National Geographic magazine.)
 
 
A sea of greenhouses surrounds a farmer’s home in the Westland region of the Netherlands.
The Dutch have become world leaders in agricultural innovation, pioneering new paths to fight hunger.
 
In a potato field near the Netherlands’ border with Belgium, Dutch farmer Jacob van den Borne is seated in the cabin of an immense harvester before an instrument panel worthy of the starship Enterprise.
 
From his perch 10 feet above the ground, he’s monitoring two drones—a driverless tractor roaming the fields and a quadcopter in the air—that provide detailed readings on soil chemistry, water content, nutrients, and growth, measuring the progress of every plant down to the individual potato. Van den Borne’s production numbers testify to the power of this “precision farming,” as it’s known. The global average yield of potatoes per acre is about nine tons. Van den Borne’s fields reliably produce more than 20.
 
That copious output is made all the more remarkable by the other side of the balance sheet: inputs. Almost two decades ago, the Dutch made a national commitment to sustainable agriculture under the rallying cry “Twice as much food using half as many resources.” Since 2000, van den Borne and many of his fellow farmers have reduced dependence on water for key crops by as much as 90 percent. They’ve almost completely eliminated the use of chemical pesticides on plants in greenhouses, and since 2009 Dutch poultry and livestock producers have cut their use of antibiotics by as much as 60 percent.
 
Furrows of artificial light lend an otherworldly aura to Westland, the greenhouse capital of the Netherlands.
Climate-controlled farms such as these grow crops around the clock.
 
One more reason to marvel: The Netherlands is a small, densely populated country, with more than 1,300 inhabitants per square mile. It’s bereft of almost every resource long thought to be necessary for large-scale agriculture. Yet it’s the globe’s number two exporter of food as measured by value, second only to the United States, which has 270 times its landmass. How on Earth have the Dutch done it?
 
Seen from the air, the Netherlands resembles no other major food producer—a fragmented patchwork of intensely cultivated fields, most of them tiny by agribusiness standards, punctuated by bustling cities and suburbs. In the country’s principal farming regions, there’s almost no potato patch, no greenhouse, no hog barn that’s out of sight of skyscrapers, manufacturing plants, or urban sprawl. More than half the nation’s land area is used for agriculture and horticulture.
 
Banks of what appear to be gargantuan mirrors stretch across the countryside, glinting when the sun shines and glowing with eerie interior light when night falls. They are Holland’s extraordinary greenhouse complexes, some of them covering 175 acres.
 
These climate-controlled farms enable a country located a scant thousand miles from the Arctic Circle to be a global leader in exports of a fair-weather fruit: the tomato. The Dutch are also the world’s top exporter of potatoes and onions and the second largest exporter of vegetables overall in terms of value. More than a third of all global trade in vegetable seeds originates in the Netherlands.
 
With demand for chicken increasing, Dutch firms are developing technology to maximize poultry production
while ensuring humane conditions. This high-tech broiler house holds up to 150,000 birds, from hatching to harvesting.
 
The Power Of Peace - Leslie Clarke Interview
 
Another conversation from the Power of Peace series by Barbara Gaughen-Muller’s Revolutionary Conversations Barbara is a member of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330.
 
Leslie was featured in a previous program, Rotary in Niger, posted by PP Susan Weaver in February 2017.  Here's what Susan had to say about Leslie.
 
    Leslie in Niger
 
"Let me introduce you to Leslie Clark, who is among the most adventurous people I have had the pleasure to know.  An honorary member of the Rotary Club of Ojai, Leslie is the force behind The Nomad Foundation.  

The story of the Nomad Foundation begins with Leslie’s reading the book 'The Nomads of Niger' by Carol van Beckwith.  Fascinated, Leslie packed her bags and set off to see Niger and to get to know the nomads for herself undeterred by the fact that the country was in a state of rebellion."
 
 
Trajectory - Rotary’s membership crisis (in Australia)
by Mark Huddleston
 
Although Mark's presentation focuses on Australia, the principles apply to Rotary around the world.  Please share your thoughts and ideas in the "Comments Area" at the bottom of this page.
 
 
 
I am delighted to release "Trajectory", which is part 1 of a 2 part membership presentation.
 
Both videos are designed to use at seminars or as a replacement for a guest speaker at a club meeting, to get your fellow members looking at our membership challenges from a different perspective.
 
A huge thank you to Rotarian Martin McGrevy who filmed and produced these videos. Martin is a true professional, and it only as a result of his passion and energy after seeing me speak at a membership symposium in Kurri Kurri earlier this year (the visit where my luggage failed to arrive) in Rotary District 9670 that convinced me to record these presentations at a subsequent visit to the district. Thanks also to DG Graeme Hooper and Sue for inviting me back and hosting me and sitting up late to have this filmed in their lovely home.
 
I hope some of you can put this to good use and will release part 2 in September.”
 
Your fellow Rotarian,
 
Mark
 
 
Another conversation from the Power of Peace series by Barbara Gaughen-Muller’s Revolutionary Conversations.  Both Barbara and Rudy are members of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330.
 
 
    PDG D5330 Rudy Westervelt
 
 
Join us on January 17 & 18, 2020 at the Ontario Convention Center, Ontario, California, USA for the Rotary World Peace Conference 2020.

The conference is hosted by the six Southern California Rotary Districts and supported through donations to Solutions for Peace Foundation Inc.

The conference will have six General Sessions, two special dinners and 104 breakout sessions over the two days. Additionally there will be an Exhibition hall with 100 exhibitors.  Attendees will join leaders and experts in sharing conflict resolution solutions that are affecting our lives, homes, communities and the world. You will leave with a plan of action to affect positive change and create peace in your life and the world.


Visit peaceconference2020.org for more information and to register.

Make your plans to attend!
 
 
Meet Our President Özlem Koçanaogullari
 
 
Özlem Koçanaogullari was born in 1976 in Izmir, Turkey. She currently lives in Izmir Turkey. Özlem is a former exchange student with AFS Intercultural Programs. She attended one year of education ('94-'95) at Shaker Heights High School in Cleveland, OH, USA. She is a licensed lawyer and practicing attorney at law in Turkey with a supplementary license to register trademarks. She has also completed an LLM program on Law of Economics.
 
She has started her own legal practice in November 2005 and she is currently teaching Intellectual Property Law at Dokuz Eylul University Fine Arts Faculty. Özlem regards volunteer work and non-profit organizations as one of the most important part of her life. She was a member of Karsiyaka Rotaract Club (District 2440) between the years 2004 and 2009, then a member of Karsiyaka Rotary Club (District 2440) between December 2010 and June 2013. She was the president of her Rotaract club for the term 2008-2009 and she was the treasurer for Karsiyaka Rotary Club in 2012-013. She has also attended two Rotary Friendship Exchange trips and hosted many Rotarians / Rotaractors through various programs. She was also committee member for RI District 2440 for two terms. She is also a member of Junior Chamber International (JCI) Turkey; for 2014 she has the duty of General Legal Counsel. She also volunteers for AFS Intercultural Programs and Turkish Red Crescent. Özlem enjoys tennis, skiing, step and aerobics, traveling in general, movies with special effects, detective tv shows and occasional wine-tasting.
 
 
 
The Power Of Peace - Peacehenge
by Rotary E-Club of World Peace Rotarian Barbara Gaughen-Muller with OWR Member J.T. Turner
 
 
 
A conversation with OWR Member J.T. Turner who is the Founding Director of Peacehenge and Barbara Gaughen-Muller.  Barbara is the president of the Santa Barbara and Tri-County chapter of the United Nations Association.
 
Barbara was inspired by her late husband, Dr. Robert  Muller, former United Nations Assistant Secretary-General. Barbara will be leading the effort for Santa Barbara, California to become an International City of Peace.  Barbara predicts "we will meet our goal of 1000 cities of peace five  years early in year 2020."
 
 
Jennifer Jones - End Polio Now
 

 
Rotary International Vice President,
2016 - 2017
 
Jennifer is the President and CEO of Media Street Productions Inc., an award winning television production company in Windsor, ON.
She is proud member of the Rotary Club of Windsor-Roseland and is a Past District Governor of District 6400.
 
Jennifer served as the Vice President of Rotary International in 2016-2017. She has served the organization as a training leader,
moderator, committee vice-chair, coordinator and President’s Representative.  She also played a lead role in Rotary’s rebranding effort as the Chair of the Strengthening Rotary’s Advisory Group.
 
Currently, she is the co-chair of the End Polio Now – Make History Today campaign to raise $150-million dollars and she is the promotions chair for the 2019 Rotary International Convention in Hamburg, Germany. One of Rotary International's most recognized communicators, Jennifer has presented keynote addresses and training workshops at hundreds of conferences across North America and in Russia, Panama, Thailand, Portugal, Finland, India, Sri Lanka, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, England, Korea, Taiwan, Brazil, Greece, Italy and Germany.
 
 
Our 2019-2020 President
 
 
Mark Daniel Maloney
 
I love to travel! I even enjoy the mundane process of getting from here to there. But last year, my wife, Gay, and I had one of those experiences that would strain the optimism of even the most cheerful traveler. We found ourselves with six hours to wait, at an airport where we were not scheduled to be, on a day we had not planned still to be traveling, having woken up that morning at a hotel unknown to us the night before. It was one of those days.
 
As we waited at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, Gay and I took a walk to people watch. We went from one end of the terminal to the other and back, looking at every gate, every destination, every group of people waiting for their flights.
 
DG Sandi and President Amina at PETS
 
 
Latest update regarding the Polio Eradication
 
Dear Rotary Polio Eradication Leaders: 
Before the rush of Rotary year end activities, I wish to give you a brief update on polio matters:
 
The polio case count continues to increase and this week it will be officially reported that we are at the same level as in all of 2018, 33 cases. But let us put this in perspective: We have experienced 4 straight years with less than 100 cases and the final cases are in some of the toughest areas for mistrust and for lack of access due to anti-government elements.
 
The news from Africa continues to be very good. In September we will have gone three years without a case of wild polio virus on the entire continent. The Regional Certification Commission for Polio Eradication for the AFRO Region will be meeting in March 2020 to consider whether the area is to be certified as free of the wild polio virus. Congratulations to all the countries in this region on your progress.
 
 
 
Acquapendente, Italy:
Celebrating Triumph Over Oppression and Injustice
by Carol Metzker, after a visit to Acquapendente, Italy, May 2019
 
If Paul Harris had been born 700 years earlier in Italy, no doubt he would have applauded the efforts of villagers in Acquapendente for their celebration of triumph over injustice.
 
 
(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).
 
 
 
 
 
Why Bill Gates Partners With Rotary To Eradicate Polio
by Devin Thorpe
Champion of Social Good | Bestselling Author | Educator | Speaker
Published in Forbes - May 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
Devin Thorpe calls himself a champion of social good. As an author, educator and keynote speaker he focuses on those doing good in the world. As a Forbes Contributor, he covers social entrepreneurship and impact investing. Past president of the National Speakers Association Mountainwest Chapter, he shares inspiring insights to help others do more good. His books on personal finance and crowdfunding draw on his entrepreneurial finance experience as an investment banker, CFO, treasurer, and mortgage broker helping people use financial resources to do good. He recognizes blockchain and crypto will change the world. Previously he worked on the U.S. Senate Banking committee staff and earned an MBA at Cornell. Visit devinthorpe.com to learn more.
 
 
Brenda Cressey has been named as the Chair of
 
 
 
Our own Brenda Cressey has been named as the Chair of The Rotary Foundation Board of Trustees for the remainder of this Rotary Year.  There has never been a female Foundation Chair in the history of the Foundation, and only a few Vice Chairs.
 
Brenda is a member of the D5240 Rotary Club of Paso Robles, California and served as Governor in 2001-2002.  That year
Brenda chartered 5 new Rotary clubs and was recognized as having the largest membership growth we have ever seen with a 350 plus member growth.
 
 
Rotary E-Club of One World Celebrates 7th Anniversary
and officially inducts New Member in Ghana
 
 
 
Rotarian Abdul Basit Abdul Rahman
 
 
The Rotary E-Club of One World D5240 California, is an electronic Rotary club that allows members to interact and attend meetings online whilst it affords traditional Rotary club members the opportunity to attend a make up meeting online at one’s own convenience. The club President, Mrs. Amina Sammo, at an event to mark the 7th Anniversary of the club on May 29, 2019, also inducted a new member residing in Ghana into the club. Mr. Abdul Basit Abdul Rahman, the new member of the club is an Executive Officer at the Ministry of Inner-City and Zongo Development and a student of the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA).
 
 
 
The Duarte Story as told by Dr Sylvia Whitlock
 
 
 
 
Author of Women Also Serve: Duarte Invites Women to Join Rotary tells her first person account of what it was like to be a woman Rotary pioneer.

Dr Sylvia Whitlock has been in Rotary for nearly forty years.  She was he second woman to join the Rotary Club of Duarte.  Whitlock went on to become the first woman Rotary Club president.  She was a District Governor in 2012-2013.  Sylvia is a recipient of many awards including the Rotary Foundation District Service Award.  She has supported an orphanage in Mexico, sunk wells in Nigeria and raised nearly $90,000 to educate girls in India.
 
The New Workplace Experience
 
We have been using the Workplace "intranet on the Internet" platform for our E-Club since January 2018 and have found it a great way to connect, communicate and share with our fellow E-Club of One World Rotarians.  Although not all members in our E-Club are engaged, Workplace is becoming popular with more Rotary E-Clubs around the world as a way to get connected and do good in the world through Rotary.
 
We first learned about Workplace from the Rotary E-Club of Innovation (formerly East Anglia) in the UK.  Our friend and fellow E-Rotarian and member of the E-Club of Innovation , Martin Brocklebank, recently presented a New Workplace tutorial on Zoom for members of the soon-to-be chartered Rotary E-Club of Social Impact based in Australia.
 
I was unable to attend the Zoom meeting Martin’s demonstration on “The New Workplace Experience” coming to Workplace in July, but Martin sent me the link to his recording to share some of the features he demonstrated.  Martin shows many of the powerful tools available in Workplace and how his E-Club uses them.  He also shares the philosophy of his E-Club and discusses some of the challenges that face all Rotary E-Clubs.  Martin and I are going to set up a Workplace Group to connect our clubs.
 
Martin not only demonstrates the new look and features coming to Workplace, but how Rotary E-Clubs are making a difference in the Rotary world.
 
Rotary E-Clubs are really putting the “International” in Rotary International!
The King of Butterflies – The Monarch Butterfly
 
 
 
 
Monarch butterflies are the most beautiful of all butterflies, some say, and are considered the "king" of the butterflies, hence the name "monarch". There are lots of very cool things to learn about the monarch butterfly and we'll try to get through most of them here.
 
 
 
 
The Life Cycle(s) of a Monarch Butterfly
Monarch butterflies go through four stages during one life cycle, and through four generations in one year. It's a little confusing but keep reading and you will understand. The four stages of the monarch butterfly life cycle are the egg, the larvae (caterpillar), the pupa (chrysalis), and the adult butterfly. The four generations are actually four different butterflies going through these four stages during one year until it is time to start over again with stage one and generation one.
 
Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here
 
 
 
Karima Bennoune is a professor of international law at the University of California-Davis School of Law. She grew up in Algeria and the United States and now lives in northern California.
 
The topic of Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here is a very personal one for her. Mahfoud Bennoune, her father, was an outspoken professor at the University of Algiers who faced death threats during the 1990s, but continued speaking out against fundamentalism and terrorism. In writing this book, Karima set out to meet people who are today doing what her father did back then, to try to garner for them greater international support than Algerian democrats received during the 1990s.
 
She graduated from a joint program in law and Middle Eastern and North African studies at the University of Michigan, earning a J.D. cum laude from the law school and an M.A. from the Rackham Graduate School, as well as a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies.
 
In 1995, she served as a Center for Women's Global Leadership delegate to the NGO Forum at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing where she provided legal advice to the Tribunal for Global Accountability for Violations of Women's Human Rights. From 1995 until 1999 she was based in London as a legal adviser at Amnesty International.
 
How to turn a group of strangers into a team
by Amy Edmondson - Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management
 
 
 
 
Amy C. Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School, a chair established to support the study of human interactions that lead to the creation of successful enterprises that contribute to the betterment of society.
 
Edmondson has been recognized by the biannual Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers in 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017 and was honored with the Talent Award in 2017.  She studies teaming, psychological safety, and leadership, and her articles have been published numerous academic and management outlets, including Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Harvard Business Review and California Management Review. Her books - Teaming: How organizations learn, innovate and compete in the knowledge economy (Jossey-Bass, 2012), Teaming to Innovate (Jossey-Bass, 2013) and Extreme Teaming (Emerald, 2017) - explore teamwork in dynamic organizational environments. In Building the future: Big teaming for audacious innovation (Berrett-Koehler, 2016), she examines the challenges and opportunities of teaming across industries to build smart cities. Her new book,The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth (Wiley, 2018), offers a practical guide for organizations serious about success in the modern economy.
 
RID Jeffery Cadorette on "Shaping Rotary's Future"
 
On 27 March 2019 I had the opportunity to attend the Zoom meeting of the Rotary E-Club of Innovation at which Rotary International Director Jeffry Cadorette was the guest speaker.  Jeff gave a compelling presentation on shaping Rotary's future.  Rotary E-Clubs will be a significant part of that future.
 
 
 
Jeffry Cadorette, Rotary International Director (RID 2018-20) retired from healthcare in 1999 after a 25-year career as a physical therapist. He had been President and CEO of Physical Therapy Associates of Delaware County in Pennsylvania until merging his practice with Riddle Memorial Hospital to form the Riddle Rehabilitation Institute and Riddle Sports Medicine. He now serves as Associate Broker and Executive Vice President at Media Real Estate Company where he is active in all phases of commercial real estate sales and leasing, tenant representation and new project development.
 
A Rotarian with the Rotary Club of Media, PA since 1977, Jeff served as Governor of District 7450 in 1998-1999.  In September of 2016 he was the selection of the Zones 24/32 Nominating Committee for Director to serve on the Rotary International Board of Directors in 2018-2020.
 
How nationalism and globalism can coexist
by Wanis Kabbaj
 
UPS's Wanis Kabbaj seeks new ways of understanding the growing complexity of our
congested cities and globalized world.
 
 
When you spend a decade working as an international marketer for UPS, with its massivetransportation network, its 454,000 employees, its 567 aircraft, its 119,000 trucksand vehicles, its 20 million packages delivered every day across 220 countries andterritories, you get to see the world through a very interesting window. You see the considerable value of its interconnectedness. You develop an instinctive mistrust forsimplistic solutions and ideas and you start embracing complexity and unorthodox waysto think it and tame it.
 
Why Climate Change Is Rotary's Business
(AND WHAT ROTARIANS ARE ALREADY DOING ABOUT IT)
from the April 2019 issue of The Rotarian
 
 
 
Rotarians understand that the whole world is their backyard. They can see the effects of climate change in communities they care about, and they haven't waited to take action. They're tackling the problem the way they always do: coming up with projects, using their connections to change policy - and planning for the future.
 
 

Water Project in Tototlan, Jalisco, Mexico from "Rotary Serving Our Community" hosted by D5240 PDG and OWR Honorary Member, Wade Nomura.
 
        WADE NOMURA
 
Wade was born in Santa Barbara, California and is a third generation Japanese-American (his family was interned in Poston Arizona during WWII). Professionally, Wade is the president of Nomura/Yamasaki Landscapes, Inc., having started the company nearly 40 years ago and has been awarded multiple beautification awards in Goleta, Santa Barbara and Goleta.
 
Wade is the President of the Japanese American Citizens League, Santa Barbara chapter. He was inducted into the Japanese American National Museum “Hall of Fame” during a special tribute to Japanese American Athletes for the 2001 “More Than A Game” exhibit for his accomplishments in the sport of BMX as a multiple National Champion and racing a bike that he designed and manufactured. The Nomura Racing bike has since become an icon among the avid BMX collectors.
 
Wade joined Rotary with his wife Roxanne, in 2002 and has been on 34 international projects missions for Rotary, including a polio mission to India, where he has a special passion, having had polio as a child. Wade served as Rotary District Governor in 2011-2012, and was the first Japanese American governor in that district’s 89 year history.
 
 

 
 
The Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group (WASRAG) was formed in 2007 by a group of Rotarians, recognized by Rotary International, and focused on WASH projects. Since then it has facilitated many hundreds of projects – helping clubs find partners, ensuring sustainability, stressing the importance of a needs-driven approach, and developing best practices. We encourage a holistic, integrated approach in which water is not the end but, is rather the means to a better life and livelihood in the community. Most importantly, WASRAG links water and sanitation to improved hygiene, better health, and empowerment of the community – especially women, irrigation and agriculture, education and literacy and, ultimately, child mortality.
 
Calling all Rotarians
As a Rotarian Action Group (RAG), WASRAG invites Rotarians from around the world to join them and engage in the battle to provide safe water, sanitation and hygiene for all.  Any Rotarian interested in supporting WASRAG can Get Involved with our activities and be Linked to global WASH assistance efforts.
 
 

They are sometimes referred to as Gen. Z (short for Generation Z),  the Digital Natives or Navigators, Post Millennials, or the iGen.
 
 
 
 
Randstad Canada describes Generation Z as those born between 1995–2014.[27] Australia's McCrindle Research Centre defines Generation Z as those born between 1995–2009, starting with a recorded rise in birth rates, and fitting their newer definition of a generational span with a maximum of 15 years.  A 2014 report from Sparks and Honey[30] and 2018 research from pscyhologist Jean Twenge[31] describe Generation Z as those born in 1995 or later. In Japan, generations are defined by a ten-year span with "Neo-Digital natives" beginning after 1996.
 
Currently there are over 74 million Americans or 24% of the U.S. population that have their birth years between 1995 and 2012.  That’s one in four of us Americans. What they are called is not as important as their characteristics and how they describe themselves.   So let’s try to understand this generation.   After all, we hope they will be future Rotarians.
 

 
 
Clean water is a basic need for human beings. When people, especially children, have access to clean water, they live healthier and more productive lives. However, at least 3,000 children die each day from diseases caused by unsafe water, which is what motivates our members to build wells, install rainwater harvesting systems, and teach community members how to maintain new infrastructure.

While very few people die of thirst, millions die from preventable waterborne diseases, providing the impetus for our members to also improve sanitation facilities in undeveloped countries. Members start by providing toilets and latrines that flush into a sewer or safe enclosure and then add education programs to promote hand-washing and other good hygiene habits.
 

Peace and Climate Change
How can Climate Change Affect Peace?
 
           Greta Thunberg
 
 
Greta Thunberg realized at a young age the lapse in what several climate experts were saying and in the actions that were being taken in society. The difference was so drastic, in her opinion, that she decided to take matters into her own hands. Greta is a 16-year-old Stockholm native who lives at home with her parents and sister Beata. She's a 10th grader in Stockholm who enjoys spending her spare time riding Icelandic horses, spending time with her families two dogs, Moses and Roxy. She loves animals and has a passion for books and science. At a young age, she became interested in the environment and convinced her family to adopt a sustainable lifestyle.
 

 
    PDG D5330 Rudy Westervelt
 
Join us on January 17 & 18, 2020 at the Ontario Convention Center, Ontario, California, USA for the Rotary World Peace Conference 2020.

The conference is hosted by the six Southern California Rotary Districts and supported through donations to Solutions for Peace Foundation Inc.

The conference will have six General Sessions, two special dinners and 104 breakout sessions over the two days. Additionally there will be an Exhibition hall with 100 exhibitors.  Attendees will join leaders and experts in sharing conflict resolution solutions that are affecting our lives, homes, communities and the world. You will leave with a plan of action to affect positive change and create peace in your life and the world.

Visit peaceconference2020.org for more information and to register today.

The following presentation is the Zoom recording of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330 meeting presented on 29 January 2019 and led by PDG Rudy Westervelt.

Make your plans to attend!
 
by Rotary E-Club of World Peace Rotarian Barbara Gaughen-Muller with Fred Arment.
 
 
A conversation with Fred Arment who is the Founding Director of International Cities of Peace and Barbara Gaughen-Muller.  Barbara is the president of the Santa Barbara and Tri-County chapter of the United Nations Association.
 
Barbara was inspired by her late husband, Dr. Robert  Muller, former United Nations Assistant Secretary-General. Barbara will be leading the effort for  Santa Barbara, California to become an International City of Peace.  Barbara predicts "we will meet our goal of 1000 cities of peace five  years early in year 2020."
 
 
Believe in Belize is a non-profit with the main focus of implementing projects and providing services in the country of Belize.   We began operations on January 1st, 2018 as an unincorporated non-profit.  The goal of the organization is to provide a place for individuals and organizations who share a common interest in helping with the development of the country of Belize.
 
 
RI President-Elect Mark Maloney announces his his theme for 2019-2020
at the
2019 International Assembly
 
 
 
 
The 2019 International Assembly, 13-19 January, is held at the Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego in San Diego, California, USA. This training meeting prepares district governors-elect for their role as governor, introduces our organization’s priorities for the coming year, and provides ample opportunities to network with fellow governors-elect from around the world.  The International Assembly also features an engaging and informative program for governor-elect partners, designed to appeal to their diverse interests and experiences.  In 2019 the International Assembly will also be joined by a select group of Rotaractors who will participate in the governor-elect sessions on Thursday and Friday of the assembly.
 
 
 
 
 
2019 International Assembly - Part 2
 
Each year in January, around 530 Rotary District Governors-Elect representing 35,000 Rotary clubs and over 1.2 million Rotarians from around the world gather in San Diego, California, USA.  At this week long event they meet the Rotary International President-Elect, prepare for their year to lead their respective Rotary districts and share Rotary at the International Assembly. Rotary's annual training meeting gives incoming district governors the chance to share ideas for strengthening clubs and improving communities with Rotary leaders from around the world.
 
Keynote speakers and informative presentations will inspire them and prepare them to lead their district successfully. Idea exchanges, roundtable discussions, and workshops will lead them to new ways of creating positive change.
 
As the Vocational Service Director for Rotary E-Club of One World, I welcome the opportunity given me by our Club President, Amina Sammo, to highlight the place that vocational service fits in Rotary in the month that Rotary International has designated as Vocational Service Month.
 
One need look no further than the guiding principles of Rotary and the Rotarian Code of Conduct to find the strong place Vocational Service plays in Rotary.  I have bolded below in those principles and code the language which I think often times come into play as we work and serve in our individual vocational pursuits.
 
 
 
This week features Part 2 of the video story on Vocational Service by PRIP Rajendra K. Saboo from the Rotary Club of Chandigarh.  Part 1 is also included in case you missed it.  (See links in "Avenues of Service" that were not active in last week's e-Bulletin).
 
As the Vocational Service Director for Rotary E-Club of One World, I welcome the opportunity given me by our Club President, Amina Sammo, to highlight the place that vocational service fits in Rotary in the month that Rotary International has designated as Vocational Service Month.
 
One need look no further than the guiding principles of Rotary and the Rotarian Code of Conduct to find the strong place Vocational Service plays in Rotary.  I have bolded below in those principles and code the language which I think often times come into play as we work and serve in our individual vocational pursuits.
 
 
At the 2014 Rotary International Convention in Sydney, Australia, a few founding Board members of the Rotarian Action Group Against Slavery-RAGAS (then called RAG Against Child Slavery) gave the first presentation about human trafficking/modern slavery at an international convention. With the opportunity to reach Rotarians all over the world, during my presentation I asked for help with a special project: to free an entire village in India from debt bondage slavery.
 
Although there are many forms of modern slavery--what the U.S. calls human trafficking--and it exists in every nation of the world, this project was special because of its holistic, sustainable solution.
 
 
I met Lisa Imel at an educational conference in Los Angeles, California in 2016.  She was an educational consultant for the mission driven, academic publishing company, Academic Innovations.  We hit it off right away and talked about her home in Cleveland, Ohio (I also have family in Ohio).   I learned that she was previously a school principal.
 
I was immediately drawn to her ideas about how the Get Focused, Stay Focused curriculum could be used worldwide and soon shared with her my Rotary E-Club of One World involvement.  Lisa likes to get people to think out of the box and the following presentation called, Change the World Through Education, is no exception.  She says,  “If we can help students  become intrinsically motivated with a well crafted 10 year plan for their lives, they will be economically self sufficient adults.  In addition, we can help them see that they also need to give back and be of service to others.”   She puts her ideas into action and the Rotary Project she describes in Cleveland can be replicated anywhere.  In fact, Lisa is working with schools in Florida and Michigan.  There are also benefits to the Rotary clubs.  It is not just a one way street of Rotary giving.  This will be seen through her program.  As a result of our conversations over the past few years, Lisa joined the Rotary Club of Cleveland.  They are lucky to have her involvement.   She’s an outstanding leader and puts her heart into everything she does.
 
 

Anatomy of a Global Grant 

In Rotary Year 2015-2016, our club contributed to a Global Grant sponsored by the Rotary Club of Ojai that aimed to improve the employment and income status of women in the town of Stolac in Bosnia and Herzegovina.  Though nominally an economic development project, our club was drawn to the project by the obvious Peacebuilding aspects it included.

 
 

Renewing Our Peacebuilder Club Status

District 5240 has made a commitment to be a Rotary Peacebuilder District, that is committed to wage peace whenever and wherever possible - in our respective local communities and all around the world. 

To promote this peace initiative, the District has established the Peacebuilder Club program designed to enhance Rotary’s mission of advancing world understanding, goodwill and peace though our programs and projects which align with the six areas of focus of The Rotary Foundation, and in particular with the focus area of Peace, Conflict Prevention and Conflict Resolution.

 
 
The Rotary Foundation Is Your Foundation
 

We Rotarians have diverse reasons for joining Rotary, but for many of us the prime motivation is a philanthropic one, a desire to make our community and our world a better place.  Individually few of us wield the resources necessary to make a significant impact, but together we are a mighty force for good and our efforts are funded in large part by the Rotary Foundation.  As November is Rotary Foundation Month on the Rotary calendar, I hope you will find this month's programs that delve into the numbers and the programs associated with The Rotary Foundation interesting.

 
 
 
Rotary NID: A Most Rewarding TRip
 

My husband and I participated in the Polio National Immunization Day in India in January of this year and it was, as we had often heard from those who had gone before us, a truly inspiring and rewarding experience. Mike and I are truly grateful to have had the opportunity to meet the extraordinary people who have been deeply engaged in the effort year after year and to participate in immunizing children so that they will never have to endure the disabilities or death that contracting polio causes. Here in advance of World Polio Day is a brief slideshow of our experience.

 
 
 
 
The Area of Focus for the month of October is “Economic and Community Development”.  Rotarians around the world are involved in projects that support investments in people and create measurable and enduring economic improvements in their lives and communities through:
  • Building capacity to support economic growth and reduce poverty
  • Developing opportunities for work
  • Providing scholarships in economic and community development
 
Our members and The Rotary Foundation work to strengthen local entrepreneurs and community leaders, particularly women, in impoverished communities.  We provide training and access to well-paying jobs and financial management institutions.  We create opportunities to help individuals and communities thrive financially and socially.
 
Nearly 800 million people throughout the globe live on less than $1.90 (US) a day.  Rotary members are passionate about providing sustainable solutions to poverty.   As Rotarians, we have a big impact on local economies.  We train people to become resources for their community, offering networking activities, advice on new business development, and mathematics and financial management training.
 
Just this past year, The Rotary Foundation has spent $9.2 million (US) to grow local economies and reduce poverty.  One out of nine people in the world (795 million people) do not have enough to eat.  As Rotarians, we are working to break the cycle of poverty for women, especially through micro-lending programs and on skills development and business training.  Sixty percent of the world’s hungry people are women and girls.  Seventy percent of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas and depend on agriculture and related activities for their livelihood.  Rotarians are working to share sustainable farming practices, which result in increased crop yields and profits.
 
 
Our second program in October on Economic and Community Development, addresses the important subject of Entrepreneurship and Microfinance.  It features a presentation at the 2017 Rotary Presidential Peace Conference, preceding the Rotary International Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.  The program’s presenter is Summer Lewis, who heads the True Roots Consulting Group, which focuses on various aspects of growing communities through entrepreneurship and microfinance.  Summer is also a former Rotary Peace Fellow.
 
 
Our third program in October on Economic and Community Development, is an “up close and personal” look at the situation currently being faced in Nicaragua, from the perspective of a member of the Center for Development in Central America (CDCA) which is a project of the Jubilee House Community, Inc. (JHC), a non-profit organization.  It has 501 (c) 3 status in the U.S. and International Mission status in Nicaragua.
 
In 2012 my wife Sandy Grasso-Boyd and I were both long time members of the Rotary Club of Santa Barbara Sunrise.  At that time the club was looking at the possibility of developing a long-term relationship with a community in Central America, with multiple needs.  With the help of Past District 5240 Governor Jan Lindsay, who had been working in Nicaragua for a number of years, our club was invited to explore possibilities with communities in the Managua vicinity. 
 
 
On 22 September we had the pleasure of welcoming William 'Will' Mosby as a guest speaker at a special Zoom meeting.  Many thanks to Nabil Bedewi for inviting Will to Speak to us.  Since his presentation, Will has submitted his application to join the Rotary E-Club of One World!
 
 
StreetCents is a think-tank that focuses on addressing the challenges of marginalized or lower income communities by offering different perspectives and solutions than those traditionally applied.
 
Be it a building or an issue, constructs can look completely different depending on one’s point of view; only when viewed by multiple sides can an object be definitively identified and – in the case of a challenge – corrected.
 
StreetCents Corporation is a non-profit organization which applies proven tactics, quantifiable data, logical actions, and blunt honesty to resolve issues impacting afflicted communities.
 
Our program invites accomplished individuals, helming from similar socio-economic backgrounds as our audience, to share their real-life personal and professional challenges which they overcame, as well as the positive experiences that empowered them, to achieve financial stability. More than just speaking engagements, StreetCents' goal is to establish long-term relationships and mentorships with the communities it serves.
 
Rather it be the curly-haired individual living in public housing or the straight- haired person struggling in the trailer park, StreetCents focuses on the commonalities that strengthens communities - such as income, drives, and concerns - not the differences that can divide - like color, status, or culture.
 
 
Our third program this month on Basic Education and Literacy Month highlights speakers from the Presidential Peacebuilding Conference 2018, which was held June 2nd of this year in Chicago.  Convened by now PRIP Ian Riseley, this session of the conference was the only one held in the U.S. and it's focus was on the myriad of ways Rotarians can advance the cause of peace by supporting education and literacy at home in our own countries and around the world.

 

 
 
 
 
Our second program this month on Basic Education and Literacy Month highlights the Guatemala Literacy Project.
 
 
 
 


To celebrate its 100th year, The Rotary Foundation recognized 20 global grants that exemplify what a project should be: a sustainable endeavor that aligns with one of Rotary’s areas of focus and is designed in cooperation with the community to address a real need. One of these exemplary grants was Improving Literacy in Guatemala, a program that has been ongoing for two decades.  The host club is the Rotary Club of Guatemala Vista Hermosa, which has collaborated through the years with more than 500 other Rotary Clubs and the non-profit organization Cooperative for Education (CoEd).

 
September is Basic Education and Literacy Month on the Rotary calendar and, in recognition of that, the programs for the next few weeks will be on this Area of Focus.
 
This week's program comprises an overview slideshow followed by two videos about specific programs doing good in the world.  I hope you will find them all informative and the latter two inspirational.
 
 
 
 
Although this is the last day of August, every month can serve as Membership & New Club Development Month.  If you haven't recommended a new Rotary member yet during this Rotary year, now would be a great time to get started.
 
There are many resources produced by Rotary to assist Clubs with Membership and New Club Development.  They enable Clubs to:
  • Assess your club
  • Engage current members
  • Connect with prospective members
  • Follow your membership leads
  • Make new members feel welcome
  • Develop your club
 
 
Ryan Deitsch and Matt Post are two students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.  At a recent meeting of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330, they talked about how the events of February 14, 2018 changed their lives forever.
 
In honor and in memory of the seventeen friends they lost that day, they are sharing their story across the United States.
 
Many thanks to the Rotary E-Club of World Peace for inviting them to their meeting to tell their story.  The meeting was called to order by President Karyn Westervelt and moderated by Past President, PDG Rudy Westervelt.
 
 
RIPP William B.  “Bill” Boyd on Peace and Peace Centers
 
 
     2006-07 RI Theme
 
 
 
 
On 24 July 2018 I and new member Laurie Deppa from Annapolis, Maryland, attended the online Zoom meeting of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330.  This Rotary E-Club meets weekly via Zoom and has great guest speakers.  I am sharing this recording of this meeting featuring RIPP (2006-07) William B.  “Bill” Boyd speaking on Peace and Peace Centers.
 
Your feedback about meeting this way would be greatly appreciated.
 
Enjoy!
 
 
 
     DG Sandi & President Amina at PETS
 
 
 
DG Sandi Schwartz's
Official Visit
28 July 2018 - Part 1
 
District 5240 Governor Sandi Schwartz has been a member of the Rotary Club of Bakersfield East since 1994 and is the sixth D5240 Governor to come from Bakersfield East.

Sandi served as the club’s President in 2013-14 and during that year Bakersfield East was recognized as the best medium sized Vocational Service Club and received the RI Presidential Citation with Distinction.  She was chosen to receive the District’s  distinguished Jock MacKenzie Leadership Award .  Her work at the District level includes Chief of Staff to Past District Governor Jim Bell as well as bed and breakfast hostess to many District leaders coming to Kern County.
 
Sandi and her husband Richard are Major Donors to The Rotary Foundation and they are both Paul Harris Society members.
 
Sandi walked the streets of India in 2004 for an National Immunization Day event that profoundly changed her life and devotion to Rotary.
 
 
     DG Sandi & President Amina at PETS
 
 
 
DG Sandi Schwartz's
Official Visit
28 July 2018 - Part 2
 
District 5240 Governor Sandi Schwartz has been a member of the Rotary Club of Bakersfield East since 1994 and is the sixth D5240 Governor to come from Bakersfield East.

Sandi served as the club’s President in 2013-14 and during that year Bakersfield East was recognized as the best medium sized Vocational Service Club and received the RI Presidential Citation with Distinction.  She was chosen to receive the District’s  distinguished Jock MacKenzie Leadership Award .  Her work at the District level includes Chief of Staff to Past District Governor Jim Bell as well as bed and breakfast hostess to many District leaders coming to Kern County.
 
Sandi and her husband Richard are Major Donors to The Rotary Foundation and they are both Paul Harris Society members.
 
Sandi walked the streets of India in 2004 for an National Immunization Day event that profoundly changed her life and devotion to Rotary.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accepts award for polio eradication
By Teresa Schmedding
and
Arnold Grahl
 
 
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accepted Rotary's Polio Eradication Champion Award at the Rotary Convention in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in recognition of his country's contributions to polio eradication. Canada has been a strong contributor to polio eradication efforts for decades.
 
In developing a project, whether it be a club based one or a global grant proposal, the assessment of the community needs is an essential step in the process. 
 
On these page at the RI website, Project Lifecycle Resources you can see that conducting a community assessment is one the 8 steps listed in developing a project; 
  • Align a project with Rotary's areas of focus
  • Obtain assistance with project design/planning and implementation
  • Learn about the global grant process
  • Conduct a community assessment
  • Identify international partners
  • Secure funding
  • Ensure the sustainability of the project
  • Establish measurement and evaluation benchmarks
RI provides a Community Assessment Tools guide that can be downloaded.  You may find that you need more guidance.   A web search of "conducting a community assessment" reveals 76,400,000 results!  Taking the time to sort through, review even 10 sites is time taken away from developing your project. 
 
So we've done that for you in presenting the "The Community Toolbox website.
 
 
By  (Source: https://99u.adobe.com/)
 
Managing creatives is a very delicate – and under-appreciated – art. We look at the qualities that empower great project managers to succeed where others fail.
 
 
Good project managers are hard enough to find, and great project managers are rarer still. Thanks to Andy Crowe, though, we now have a peek inside the top 2 percent of project managers, based on a study of 860 of them as rated by their peers/clients. Not surprisingly, great project management requires a lot more than the ability to move a milestone.
 
 

 

Here are the top 10 traits of project managers who are really making ideas happen:

 

Defined as:  “the act or fact of doing something that involves danger or risk in order to achieve a goal”

Take A Risk:  The Odds Are Better Than You Think
by Margie Warrell (https://margiewarrell.com/)
As you look back on your career and life to date, where do you wished you’d been a little braver, trusted in yourself more, and been less cautious in the chances you took?
 

Water Filtration Project Hacienda de la Labor, Mexico

By Bernadine Janzen

 
 
 
Imagine living in a small village of 139 people located 1 km from the shores of Lake Chapala, Mexico, the largest freshwater inland lake in Mexico and you have to buy bottled water.
 
Where a Mexican prison and a gated community within 3 km from the village, on the same road, have on-site water treatment facilities and your village doesn’t?
 
If you’re part of the  “lucky” half of the village to have access to water provided by the Chapala Municipality you may not have the money to pay for water connections to your house and within your house or the annual water bill.
 
 
Three thoughtful ways to conserve water
by Lana Mazahreh
 
 
According to the UN, nearly one in three people worldwide live in a country facing a water crisis, and less than five percent of the world lives in a country that has more water today than it did 20 years ago. Lana Mazahreh grew up in Jordan, a state that has experienced absolute water scarcity since 1973, where she learned how to conserve water as soon as she was old enough to learn how to write her name. In this practical talk, she shares three lessons from water-poor countries on how to save water and address what's fast becoming a global crisis.
 

 
 
 
 
A global food crisis may be less than a decade away
by Sara Menker
 
 
 
Sara Menker is the founder and CEO of Gro Intelligence, a software company focused on the global food and agriculture markets. Through Gro, users can extract powerful insights and access predictive modeling at a scale never before possible. By funneling trillions of data points into a powerful, singular experience, Gro Intelligence enables a comprehensive, holistic, and timely picture of global agriculture.

 
 
 
 
 
Cliff Dochterman - When did Rotary really start?
 
A humorous speech from past (1992-93) Rotary International President Cliff Dochterman on the beginning of Rotary.  He discusses the origins of Rotary in Ancient Greece and President Julius, and goes on to talk about all of the “historic” Rotarians.  Cliff’s Presidential Theme was “Real Happiness Is Helping Others.”  If you’ve never had the chance to see Cliff in person, you don’t want to miss this!
 
 
(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).
 

 

 
 
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The Thousand Smiles Foundation was formed by Rotarians from the National City Rotary Club, National City, CA and the Chula Vista Rotary Club in Chula Vista, CA in 1985 and has operated since then. It is considered a Rotary International project and has been the recipient of several grants from The Rotary Foundation and individual Rotary Clubs. Its Board of Directors now consists of Rotarians from California Rotary District 5340, California Rotary District 5330 and NW Mexico Rotary District 4110. Rotarians from many other districts participate and contribute to this project. Four two-day clinics are held yearly, generally the first Friday and Saturday of February, May, August and November. The clinic and its volunteers comply with all Mexican Government and Health Department Regulations.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
An incredible early childhood education program for refugee kids.
 
 
I thought this project, a collaboration between the International Rescue Committee and Sesame Street to provide early childhood education to refugee children in the Middle East, would make a great weekly program. At 35 minutes, it's rather long, but I was spellbound.
 
 
 
Stop Multitasking NOW!
Why It's NOT Efficient to Multitask
 
 
When you try to do two things at once, you can't or won't do either well.  If you think multitasking is an efficient way to get more done, you've got it backward.  It's an efficient way to get less done.  In the world of results, it will fail you every time.  And for some reason in today's society, doing just one thing at a time seems downright wasteful.
 
 
Managing Change
by my friend and FRIP, Mitty Chang
 
 
Mitty Chang is the Creative Director and Founder of Candeavor, a digital marketing and design agency based in the San Francisco bay area. As a millennial, Mitty grew up during the internet high tech boom during the turn of the century. His entrepreneurial spirit started young. Mitty built his first website while in the fourth grade, and began his first business as a freelance web designer while in the seventh grade. Over 15 years later, Mitty continues designing and developing websites professionally, while giving back to his community through Rotary.
 
 
 
 
Two conversations that changed my life
by Tamara Taggart
 
     Tamara and Beckett
 
Tamara Taggart is an award-winning Anchor for CTV News at Six, a working mother and wife. Tamara has 3 beautiful children and 1 of them just happens to have an extra chromosome. Tamara has had numerous conversations with healthcare professionals regarding her son Beckett, and has led her to where she is today, that the conversation needs to change.
 
 
 
 
Cryptocurrency or Blockchain
 
 
 
 
IF we look into our crystal balls, how will we handle money and commerce in the future?

Who has no idea what CRYPTOCURRENCY means? If you have ever wondered about Bitcoins and the future of currency, this Rotary Program is for you.
 
An oversimplified definition of Crypto currency:

Few people know, but cryptocurrencies emerged as a side product of another invention. Satoshi Nakamoto, the unknown inventor of Bitcoin, the first and still most important cryptocurrency, never intended to invent a currency.
 
In his announcement of Bitcoin in late 2008, Satoshi said he developed “A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System.“  His goal was to invent something; many people failed to create before digital cash.
 
 
The world doesn't need more nuclear weapons
by Erika Gregory
 
 
 
Erika Gregory is a recognized catalyst for innovation. Over the last 25 years at companies like Global Business Network, The Idea Factory, Collective Invention and N Square, Erika has led creative approaches to some of most crucial social challenges of our time-from reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation to providing excellent education opportunities for children in poverty.
 
As a scenario planner, a long-time entrepreneur, and a classically-trained actor, Erika's work draws in equal parts from a deep understanding of the creative process and the dynamics of collaboration, particularly in ill-defined or ambiguous circumstances. She brings to her work intelligence, humor, an enjoyment of people and the ability to grasp and communicate complex concepts.
 
 
 
free tour for Dzorwulu Special School
 
 
 
President Elect Amina Hajia Sammo
 
On Saturday, 17th February, 2018, three of our members in Accra, Ghana, President Elect Amina Hajia Sammo, Richard “One Dollar” Nii Commey Otoo and Seth Kwame Acheampong, along with Lionize Tourism Consult, a tourism company with interest in Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) in collaboration with Tour Guides Association of Ghana organized its second Annual Disability Tour for Dzorwulu Special School.

The tour is to educate and entertain Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) with the call for greater attention for persons with disability. There were 25 students and four teachers from the Dzorwulu Special School.

 
The first stop of the tour was at Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum where the children were taken around the Mausoleum and educated about the first president of Ghana, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah.  The Mausoleum houses the mortal remains of Ghana's first President, Dr Kwame Nkrumah and his wife, Fathia Nkrumah.
 
The tour continue to Independence Square where the children and the teachers had a photo shoot in front of the Independence Arch.

The students last stop of the tour was the Osu Castle or Fort Christiansborg, formerly the seat of government. They were taken around the castle by Madam Matilda, the tour guide and had the opportunity to know the history of the castle.
 
 
Music Can Help Us Understand Peace and Conflict
Presented by David LaMotte - Rotary Peace Fellow
 
 
 
 
 
 
David LaMotte is an award-winning songwriter, speaker and writer. He has performed over 3000 concerts and released twelve full-length CDs of primarily original music, touring in all of the fifty states, as well as five of the seven continents. The Boston Globe writes that his music "pushes the envelope with challenging lyrics and unusual tunings, but he also pays homage to folk tradition," while BBC Radio Belfast lauds his "charm, stories, humour, insightful songs, sweet voice and dazzling guitar ability."
 
LaMotte suspended his eighteen-year music career at its peak in 2008 to pursue his other primary vocation by accepting a Rotary World Peace Fellowship to study International Relations, Peace and Conflict Resolution at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. As part of that study, he also spent time in rural Andhra Pradesh, India working with a Gandhian development organization.
 
David has published three books, including two illustrated children's books. The first based on his award-winning children's song SS Bathtub and the second, White Flour, tells the true story of a creative, effective, and whimsical response to a Ku Klux Klan march in Knoxville, Tennessee by a group called the Coup Clutz Clowns. His most recent book, Worldchanging 101: Challenging the Myth of Powerlessness, is being used as a textbook in universities in the United States and Australia.
 
 
What I learned when I conquered the World's Toughest Triathlon
by Polio Survivot Minda Dentler
 
 
 
 
A 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and then a full-length marathon on hot, dry ground -- with no breaks in between: the legendary Ironman triathlon in Kona, Hawaii, is a bucket list goal for champion athletes. But when Minda Dentler decided to take it on, she had bigger aspirations than just another medal around her neck. She tells the story of how she conquered this epic race, and what it inspired her to do next.
 
A record-setting triathlete, Minda Dentler is a polio survivor committed to inspiring people to move beyond their fear of failure and achieve their goals.
 
 
2018-19 RI President Barry Rassin
wants Rotary members to
"Be the Inspiration"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rotary International President-elect Barry Rassin laid out his vision for the future of the organization at the International Assembly, calling on Rotary leaders to work for a sustainable future and to inspire Rotarians and the community at large.
 
Rassin, a member of the Rotary Club of East Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas, unveiled the 2018-19 presidential theme, Be the Inspiration, to incoming district governors at Rotary's International Assembly in San Diego, California, USA. "I want you to inspire in your clubs, your Rotarians, that desire for something greater. The drive to do more, to be more, to create something that will live beyond each of us."
 
 
International Assembly - Working Toward Peace
by Summer Lewis, Rotary Peace Fellow
 
 
               Summer Lewis
 
Rotary's annual training meeting, the International Assembly, gives the world’s incoming district governors the chance to share ideas for strengthening clubs and improving communities with Rotary leaders from around the world.
 
Summer is originally from Manhattan, Kansas and graduated from Kansas State University in 2005 with a Bachelor of Arts in sociology, Spanish, and women's studies. She was selected as a Rotary Peace Fellow and completed her Master's in international studies: peace and conflict resolution at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia in 2012. Summer has over 10 years of experience in international development, focusing her career and academic studies on trade, commodity value chains and small-scale producers. She is committed to raising awareness about the structural violence, and therefore conflict, that occurs when people are unable to meet their basic needs and provide for their families. Summer is specifically passionate about coffee, 70% of which is produced by small-scale farmers and is the second-most traded commodity after oil. Summer is the co-founder of True Roots Consulting and is currently based in Oaxaca, Mexico. True Roots offers value chain development, project management, and monitoring and evaluation services for social projects in Latin American coffee-farming communities and beyond.
 
 
Rotary's Brand: Essence, Value, and Voice
by RI Communications Committee Chair, Bradford R. Howard
 
 
          Bradford R. Howard
 
 
Rotary's annual training meeting, the International Assembly, gives the world’s incoming district governors the chance to share ideas for strengthening clubs and improving communities with Rotary leaders from around the world.
 
Keynote speakers and informative presentations will inspire you and prepare you to lead your district successfully. Breakout sessions, roundtable discussions, and workshops will introduce you to new ways of creating positive change.
 
The following presentation by RI Communications Committee Chair Brad Howard, addresses the Essence, Value, and Voice of Rotary’s Brand.
 
 
 
Peace Literacy
A Skill for the 21st Century
 
 
          Paul K. Chappell
 
Our newest OWR member, Paul K. Chappell, is an international peace educator and serves as the Peace Literacy Director of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. He graduated from West Point, was deployed to Iraq, and left active duty as a Captain. He is the author of the seven-book Road to Peace series about ending war, waging peace, the art of living, and our shared humanity. The first six published books in this series are Will War Ever End?, The End of War, Peaceful Revolution, The Art of Waging Peace, The Cosmic Ocean, and Soldiers of Peace. Lecturing across the United States and internationally, he also teaches courses and workshops on peace leadership and peace literacy. Chappell grew up in Alabama, the son of a half-black and half-white father who fought in the Korean and Vietnam wars, and a Korean mother. Having grown up in a violent household, Chappell has forged a new understanding of war and peace, rage and trauma, and vision, purpose, and hope.
 
 
 
Peace Literacy
A Skill for the 21st Century
 
The Post Meeting Discussion
 
 
          Paul K. Chappell
 
Our newest OWR member, Paul K. Chappell, is an international peace educator and serves as the Peace Literacy Director of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. He graduated from West Point, was deployed to Iraq, and left active duty as a Captain. He is the author of the seven-book Road to Peace series about ending war, waging peace, the art of living, and our shared humanity. The first six published books in this series are Will War Ever End?, The End of War, Peaceful Revolution, The Art of Waging Peace, The Cosmic Ocean, and Soldiers of Peace. Lecturing across the United States and internationally, he also teaches courses and workshops on peace leadership and peace literacy. Chappell grew up in Alabama, the son of a half-black and half-white father who fought in the Korean and Vietnam wars, and a Korean mother. Having grown up in a violent household, Chappell has forged a new understanding of war and peace, rage and trauma, and vision, purpose, and hope.
 
The Importance of Grassroots Peacemaking and
Rotarians' Contribution to Peace Around the World!
by Matts Ingermanson
 
 
 
Matts Ingemanson, Chair and Founding Member of Rotary Grassroots Peacemaking and is a Rotary International Past District Governor, elaborates on how promoting peace is a win-win situation.
 
Matts is a multiple Paul Harris Fellow.  He joined the Rotary Club of New York in 1998 and later transferred to the Rotary Club of Yonkers in 2008, where he served as President 2009-2011.
 
Matts is also a Founding Member of the Rotary Global History Fellowship.  He has served as Vice Chairman 2001-2003 and Chairman 2004-2006.  Rotary Global History Fellowship’s website receives 1 million visits per year from Rotarians around the world.
 
Since Rotary is a volunteer service organization, Matts supports the individual passions for Rotary Service among Rotarians. He also seeks to attract passionate young people into Rotary and to show them how their passions to serve can be supported by the resources of Rotary’s worldwide organization.
 
Take a Virtual Trip to Sri Lanka
presented by Hans and Helena Dahlin
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rotary Club of  Goleta Noontime members, International Service Co-Chairs PP Hans and former OWR member Helena Dahlen, share their experiences on their trip to Sri Lanka in July 2017 in this video documentary.  Acting as the sponsor club, Goleta Noontime has partnered with RC Colombo East on a Global Grant that funds early childhood learning in rural Sri Lanka.
 
 
 
 
by Dr. Ira Helfand
 
                 
 
About Ira Helfand:
 
Ira Helfand, MD is co-president of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, recipient of the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize, and he is co-founder and past president of Physicians for Social Responsibility, IPPNW's US affiliate. He has published studies on the medical consequences of nuclear war in the New England Journal of Medicine, and the British Medical Journal, and has lectured widely in the United States, and in India, China, Japan, Russia, South Africa, Israel, Pakistan, Mexico, Brazil, and throughout Europe on the health effects of nuclear weapons. He represented PSR and IPPNW at the Nobel ceremonies in Oslo in December 2009, honoring President Obama, and presented their new report, Nuclear Famine: One Billion People at Risk, at the Nobel Peace Laureates Summit in Chicago in April of 2012.  A second edition was released in December of 2013.
 

This is a selection form the WeAreRotary.TV series

Rotary Serving Our Community

 

Dr. Sylvia Whitlock

First Woman Rotary Club President

 

Hosted by PDG Wade Nomura

 

Sylvia Whitlock was born in New York City but was educated, through high school, in Kingston, Jamaica. After returning to New York City she earned a B.A. in Psychology from Hunter College. Sylvia worked for the United Nations, as a Statistical Clerk, at the Secretariat Building in New York, before moving to California to start a career in Education. In California she went on to earn a Masters Degree, cum laude, in Education from Cal Poly, Pomona, and a Ph.D., cum laude, in Education, from Claremont Graduate School. Subsequently, she earned another Masters Degree, in Marriage and Family Therapy, from Azusa Pacific University, and began a second career as a therapist. She is licensed by the Board of Behavioral Sciences in California.
 

This is a selection form the WeAreRotary.TV series

Rotary Serving Our Community

Rotary is Peace

Hosted by PDG Wade Nomura

 
(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).
 
 
 
 

 

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This is a selection form the WeAreRotary.TV series

Rotary Serving Our Community

International Service Club Presidents Summit

Hosted by PDG Wade Nomura

 
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This is a selection form the WeAreRotary.TV series

Rotary Serving Our Community

 

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Who We Are
 
ShelterBox is a global organization made up of people who believe in shelter as a human right - that shelter from the chaos of disaster and conflict is vital.
 
When people are plunged into crisis, normality is suspended. But good, quality shelter can cut through the chaos. This is why we provide the tools that enable people to rebuild homes and transform their lives.
 

 

 
 
District Governor John Weiss visited the Rotary E-Club of One World this past Saturday, 18 November 2017 via Zoom.  Before his presentation, those in attendance enjoyed visiting with John who is recovering from a recent surgery to remove a tumor on his liver.
 
John joined the Rotary Club of Morro Bay in 2001 and served as that club’s president in the 2009-2010 Rotary Year.  Following his presidential year, John created and started presenting district membership seminars.  For the past four years, he has served as an instructor on Engaging Members at PETS.
 
Leading by example, John has personally sponsored more than 50 new members into Rotary which could be some kind of record!
 

 

 

You can bet that when The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation decides to invest some of their billions of dollars into an organization and its projects, they do their due diligence carefully. Each of us has the opportunity to piggyback on their thorough investment research and give annually to The Rotary Foundation, the nonprofit organization that received the highest possible score by Charity Navigator (100 out of 100) and was named as the World’s Outstanding Foundation” by the Association of Fundraising Professionals. 

There is a reason that Rotarians donate to The Rotary Foundation.  It is a simple way to achieve your philanthropic goals, whether it’s supporting clean water, eradication of polio, or a particular global grant. “Even the smallest gifts can be donated to a specific fund – a global grant, polio, or an area of focus within the World Fund,” says April Jensen, a member of the Rotary Club of Evanston, IL who works in fund development for the Foundation.

 

(A proposal for our consideration from the Rotary Club of Ventura, California).

What is Happening?

There is only one crossing between the Southern African country of Zambia and neighbor Botswana, which is in the town of Kazungula.  The Zambesi River flows between the two countries, and all vehicles must be carried over on a pontoon.  Commercial trucks wait in a queue for up to 10 days, during which time the drivers play cards, listen to music, and way too often, entice vulnerable young girls to “entertain” them.  This is much easier than it should be in an extremely impoverished town with a history of sexual abuse and child marriage.  The sexual abuse endured by these young girls and women provides sustenance for families that otherwise would have none.  With no alternative source of income, many girls and young women become victims.

 

What Could Possibly Be Done to Help?

There is a ray of hope. Prominent civic leaders in Livingstone, Zambia—a nearby tourist destination—decided to take action.  They identified 3 areas where trained young women can find employment—tailoring, computer work, and food preparation.  They formed an NGO, and opened The Grace Center for counseling and training.  In addition, the Grace Center hopes to provide funds for secondary school education.  

They have ambitious goals, but so far they only have enough funding for the tailoring program, which has enrolled 30 young girls and women.  With additional funding, a small factory can be created in the existing space to produce school uniforms and retail clothing.  Construction has begun on a food preparation school and a restaurant, a first for Kazungula! Skilled graduates can also find employment in surrounding tourist hotels and lodges.  Finally, computers are being acquired, and trained graduates will be highly employable at the local customs offices, as well as tourist hotels and lodges around Livingstone.


 
 
 
On World Polio Day, 24 October 2017, I had the pleasure of attending the online Zoom meeting of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330.  Hosted by PDG Rudy Westervelt, PRIP Cliff Dochterman was the guest speaker.  Since joining Rotary in 1980, Cliff has always been the most inspiring Rotarian I have ever met.  Now 91 years old, Cliff continues to inspire and gave this account of how PolioPlus began and the challenges he faced to convince Rotary it could be done.
 
Cliff Dochterman’s professional life included 40 years in higher education administration – 20 years each at the University of California in Berkeley and at the University of Pacific in Stockton, California.
 
Most of us know him for his volunteer work for Rotary over the past 50 years.   He has served in almost every Rotary assignment in the world.  From Berkeley Rotary Club president (1963-64) [the Club's silver anniversary], to District 5160 Governor (1968-69), University Hills Club President (1971-72) [1971 Charter President, RC of University Hills, CO, D5450] to Rotary International Director (1983-85), R.I. Vice President (1984-85), President of Rotary International (1992-93), Trustee and Chairman of The Rotary Foundation (1993-99)  and chairman of virtually every Rotary committee.  It has been said that Cliff has spoken before more Rotary Clubs than anyone in the world.
 
 

 
 
 
   PRIP Cliff Dochterman
 
On World Polio Day, 24 October 2017, I had the pleasure of attending the online Zoom meeting of the Rotary E-Club of World Peace D5330.  Hosted by PDG Rudy Westervelt,  PRIP Cliff Dochterman was the guest speaker.
 
Last week in Part 1, Cliff told the inspiring and captivating story of how the PolioPlus project to eradicate polio in the world and protect children from this crippling disease began.  This week features the post program discussion of other challenges that face our world post polio and how Rotary and Rotarians will lead the way.
 
Enjoy the discussion and the great stories Cliff tells of his adventures in service throughout his 60 year career as a Rotarian!
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
In 1997, American Charles Moore was sailing his yacht back to California after participating in the Los Angeles to Hawaii yacht race. He chose a short cut usually avoided by sailors and entered the North Pacific Gyre…
 
In a gyre, very little wind and extremely high pressure weather systems combine to greatly reduce ocean circulation. The largest marine ocean ecosystems are subtropical gyres which cover 40% of the earth’s surface. These immense regions of slowly spiraling warm equatorial air pull in winds and converging sea currents. Everything in a gyre moves slowly. Yachtsmen avoid them because there is too little wind for effective sailing. Gyres are the ‘doldrums’ of maritime history and legends. They contain regions of ‘dead calm’ where no wind blows for several days. Surface chlorophyll density is low, plant and animal growth and biomass is low as well.
 
 
What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch
 

(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).

 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
How many of you spent a large part of your childhood years playing outdoors...or going on field trips during the school day?
 
 
 
 
 
It’s hard to overstate how much good nature does for our well-being: Study after study documents the psychological and physical benefits of connecting with nature. People who are more connected with nature are happier, feel more vital, and have more meaning in their lives.
 
Even in small doses, nature is a potent elixir: When their hospital room had flowers and foliage, post-surgery patients needed less painkillers and reported less fatigue. And merely looking at pictures of nature does speed up mental restoration and improves cognitive functioning.
 
These studies, along with hundreds of others, all point to the same conclusion: We stand to benefit tremendously from nurturing a strong connection with nature. Yet our connection to nature seems more tenuous than ever today—a time when our children can name more Pokémon characters than wildlife species.“  (From: "How Modern Life Became Disconnected from Nature.”
 

 
 
Putting A Face On Polio - Epidemics to Eradication
by Joan Toone
Rotarian and Polio Survivor
 
 
Joan was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada and contracted polio during the 1951 epidemics. Her family moved to Victoria British Columbia where she married Terry in 1964.  They  have a son, a daughter and four grandchildren.  Thirty years after acute polio, Joan began to experience cold intolerance, muscle weakness and extreme fatigue.  She was diagnosed with Post-Polio Syndrome which is an after-effect of polio.  She then began the long journey of surgeries and rehabilitation.
 
When Rotary International began their number one priority of eradicating polio, she became an avid supporter, speaking to Rotarians about polio and Post-Polio Syndrome.  Joan emphasizes the necessity of vaccines when speaking with younger people who often get conflicting information and presents herself as a first-hand example of what immunizations can prevent.
Joan deeply admires Rotary’s commitment to the children of our world.  Joan and Terry have worked for polio eradication for many years and feel privileged they will see the end of polio in this world very soon.  Joan says that to have been a small part of that is simply outstanding.
 
Joan is the President of the Post-Polio Society of British Columbia and the current President of the Rotary Club of Victoria, BC.  She is a Multiple Paul Harris Fellow and a Rotary Foundation Benefactor.  Joan has received a President’s Commendation and a District 5020 Award of Excellence.  She has received the Rotary Foundation District Service Award - twice.  Joan has also been presented with the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award and the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers.
 
 

 
Harry McCann – 19-year-old entrepreneur | public speaker from
Kildare, Ireland shares his incredible achievements
 
 
 
Harry’s story
 
Harry McCann is an 19-year-old entrepreneur from Kildare, Ireland. He founded his first business, Kid Tech when he was 15.

In May 2014 he went on to found the first Digital Youth Council (DYC) in the world to make sure young people are influencing the future of STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics]. Harry is also working on Trendster Press, a news site that encourages young people to get more involved with current affairs.

Through DYC Harry has introduced over 800 children across Ireland to coding, and has developed courses being used in schools today. The Digital Youth Council is the first of its kind to launch in Europe.  Comprised of some of the top young people in STEM in Ireland, the Youth Council aims to give a voice to young people involved in STEM in Ireland and provide them with a platform to influence the National Digital Strategy, and the future of STEM in education and everyday life.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Japanese Artist, Junkyu Muto Creates PEACE Sculptures
 
 
After a recent visit to Devil’s Tower National Monument in Wyoming, I was interested in knowing more about the sculptor that created the “Circle of Sacred Smoke” that frames the 800 ft. tower of rock.
 
Before I share the Peace sculptures, I’d like to begin with a bit about this interesting artist.   Junkyu was born in 1950 in Sendai, Japan.  He graduated from the University of Fine Arts of Tokyo., Japan Design Department.   He traveled and lived in both France and Spain and finally decided to settle in Italy and owned a studio in Rome.  Muto has lived in Italy for the past 35 years. He moved there to study classical works of such artists as Michelangelo and to work with white carrara marble, which is only available in Italy.  The marble, which comes from the Carrarra Mountains in Italy, is the only kind Muto uses for his carvings. He calls it the "best marble in the world."
 
 
 
Note: This Program was originally posted by Past President Susan Weaver in December 2015.  We are presenting it again this week in celebration of U.N. International Day of Peace on 21 September 2017.  Click here for more information at the Rotarian Action Group for Peace.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

World Peace has seemed pretty elusive lately.  We pray for peace, we tweet for peace, we visualize peace, and yet it fails to materialize.  

 

John Hunter, a teacher in Albemarle, Virginia, has put his hope for world peace in the hands of his fourth-grade classes.  In 1978, Hunter began his teaching career and over the course of it has developed the World Peace Game. Each year since the game’s inception, his students have worked together to solve the problems that lead to conflict.

 

 


 
 
Across the world, Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) is the largest killer of children under five years of age, contributing to nearly half of all childhood deaths.  Defined by a very low weight to height ratio, visible severe wasting, or by the presence of nutritional edema, an estimated 20 million children suffer from SAM, and malnutrition contributes to the death of more than 3 million children a year.  In a nutshell (peanut pun intended), Project Peanut Butter (PPB) helps communities manufacture and distribute a peanut based formula that when fed to children with SAM has a 95% full recovery rate.  Currently 11 Rotary Districts and over 150 clubs participate in PPB where they are able to save one child for about $25.00!
 

 
My wish: To launch a new era of openness in business
by Charmian Gooch
 
Charmian Gooch is the 2014 TED Prize winner. At Global Witness, she exposes how a global architecture of corruption is woven into the extraction and exploitation of natural resources.
 
 
Charmian Gooch co-founded the watchdog NGO Global Witness with colleagues Simon Taylor and Patrick Alley, in response to growing concerns over covert warfare funded by illicit trade in 1993. Since then, Global Witness has captured headlines for their exposé of "blood diamonds" in Uganda, of mineral exploitation in the Congo, of illegal timber trade between Cambodia and Thailand, and more. With unique expertise on the shadowy threads connecting corrupt businesses and governments, Global Witness continues its quest to uncover and root out the sources of exploitation.
 
In 2014, Gooch and Global Witness were awarded the $1 million TED Prize, along with the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship, for their campaign to end anonymous companies. Gooch's TED Prize wish: for us to know who ultimately owns and controls companies and launch a new era of openness in business. Global Witness highlighted the importance of this issue in an investigation, aired on 60 Minutes, where they sent an undercover investigator into 13 New York law firms. The investigator posed as an adviser to a government minister in Africa and asked for thoughts on how to move money into the United States for a plane, a yacht and a brownstone. All but one firm offered advice.
 

 
Appreciating Passion and Engagement - In France

By Carol Metzker, OWR member and co-author of “Appreciative Intelligence: Seeing the Mighty Oak in the Acorn
 
Carol in Lavender
(she's in there somewhere)
 
Authentic appreciation can work wonders for others and ourselves. Appreciation does more than elevate a recipient’s mood—it can change outcomes, raise the level of our well-being, and orchestrate a new future for friendships, work, family and community development. It can fuel creativity and innovation, leadership and success. Simply put, looking for what is positive in a situation and giving it recognition makes life better.
 

 
Our South Africa Journey and
Hosting by Members of the Rotary International Travel and
Hosting Fellowship (ITHF)
and Friendship Force International (FFI)
February 9 through March 13, 2015
 
by OWR Rotarian Bill Boyd
 
 
        Bill and Sandy Boyd at Monkey Land
 
We embarked on our  “South Africa Journey” in early 2014.  In addition to the Rotary Club of Santa Barbara Sunrise, my wife Sandy and I both belonged to The Friendship Force of Santa Barbara (FFSB), affiliated with  Friendship Force International (FFI). Through our affiliation with FFI and the Rotary International Travel and Hosting Fellowship ITHF, we planned a month long excursion where we were hosted by a Friendship Force group in Capetown for one week and 6 South African Rotarians and their families for 18 days throughout South Africa.   The remaining 6 days were spent on safari in Kruger National Park.
 
FFI is an international organization founded in 1977 by then President Jimmy Carter with his wife Rosalyn as honorary Chair and the Reverend Dr. Wayne Smith, a former missionary to Brazil. They realized how exciting a home stay in a foreign country could be as a way to meet and get to know people and as a step to understanding a foreign culture.  The primary goal was to further world peace.  To further this goal, they created a non-profit, Friendship Force International.  The organization’s purpose is to arrange and facilitate, alternating home-stay visits by ordinary citizens who would travel as domestic ambassadors to other countries.
 

 
Our South Africa Journey and
Hosting by Members of the Rotary International Travel and
Hosting Fellowship (ITHF)
and Friendship Force International (FFI)
February 9 through March 13, 2015
 
by OWR Rotarian Bill Boyd
 
 
 Bill and Sandy Boyd at Monkey Land
 
Follow-up to our South Africa Journey
 
Subsequent to our South Africa Journey, my wife Sandy sent the following photo and an email to the Rotarian Magazine regarding our stay in the Durban area:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

About the Photo and the
Rotary Project

Our first destination was Phakama, a small rectangular community center supported in part by the Hillcrest Rotary club, the Catholic Church and Embo Craft, training and craft facility founded by the local Lions Club.  We met the center coordinator Mr. Shandu, also Linda Venton of Embo Craft and other locals in the parking lot.  They led us inside one half of the building, which was operating as a sewing center training facility for about 20 Zulu seniors.  Both men and women were sitting at manual sewing machines, learning to sew. The above photo which Sandy submitted was of one of these seniors.
 

 
 
 
2018 Tournament of Roses Theme Announced
 
On January 19, 2017 the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee was thrilled to hear Lance Tibbet, President of the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, announce "Making a Difference" as the 2018 Rose Parade theme to promote recognition of the good work of volunteers.  What a perfect blend for a float promoting Rotary and the works of its volunteers!
 
Two days earlier on January 17, 2017 Rotary International President Elect Ian H.S. Riseley announced to Rotarians at the International Assembly the 2017-2018 Rotary theme "Rotary:  Making A Difference."  President Elect Ian explained to attendees that "In Rotary we know we can do more together than what we can do alone...we are united in our common goals...it is Rotary making a difference to build stronger and more active clubs that serve in better and more lasting ways.  It is believing in a Rotary that is recognized for the good work that it does.  A Rotary that will continue to grow, to endure, to go from strength to strength - making a difference to our communities, our countries, our world and our souls.  This is what we will achieve next year - “Rotary Making A Difference.”
 
The Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee (RRPFC) is sustained by Rotary Districts 5300, 5190, 5240, 5280, 5320, 5330, 5340, and 5500 and receives no funding from Rotary International.  The decorators and members of the committee represent over 26 Rotary Districts in the USA and Canada and donate hundreds of hours to insure we have a beautiful and successful float.
 

 
 
Josh Schukman Social Entrepreneurship
 
 
I would like to thank Gordon Crann, 2016-17 President of the Rotary E-Club of Southern Ontario - Western New York (SOWNY), for sharing with us this recent Zoom presentation given to his E-Club.  Josh Schukman is from Kansas and was awarded a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship to Peru after graduating from college in Minnesota.
 
In his presentation, Josh shares his journey "From Ambassadorial Scholar to Social Entrepreneur."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Have you ever jumped out of an airplane?  Been bungee jumping from the world’s tallest bungee platform?  Traveled to an exotic location all by your self?  Presented or spoke in front of a large audience?  Gone Mountain climbing?  Flying on a trapeze?
 
What is a comfort zone?  Can you measure your comfort zones?  Why should you do something out of your comfort zone?
 
 
 
 
 
 


Photo courtesy Monterey Bay Aquarium


 

I recently had the opportunity to visit the Monterey Bay Aquarium, one of my favorite places along California's Central Coast and certainly one of the world's pre-eminent aquaria. Monterey Bay Aquarium opened in 1984 - it will celebrate its 30th anniversary on October 20th. It is located on Monterey's famous Cannery Row (you may have read the book so titled by John Steinbeck, a native of nearby Salinas).

The aquarium's site was once the Hovden Cannery, which opened in 1916 and closed in 1973, when the sardine fishery in Monterey collapsed. About four years later, a group of marine scientists and area residents envisioned an aquarium where the Hovden Cannery had once been, and in 1978 the Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation was formed with the support and financial assistance of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, which made a one-time gift of $55 million dollars so that the aquarium could be constructed.

  

Photos courtesy Monterey Bay Aquarium

 
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David was moved after watching "Invisible Threat", a film about immunization produced by high school students in Carlsbad CA, which was sponsored by several Rotary clubs and is featured in the August 2015 Rotarian Magazine. It is a bit long (40 minutes) but incredibly powerful, so he thought that it would make a great program for the club. Thanks David!
 
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Origami is the ancient art of paper folding. Generally thought of as a decorative art, origami is being used by engineers to produce some amazing things.
 
 

Perhaps you will recall that in the 2013-2014 Rotary year, Sakuji Tanaka’s Presidential Theme was Peace Through Service. Something you may not have noticed in the theme logo, because it was a very subtle image, was the origami crane in the upper left hand corner.

In Japanese culture the crane is a symbol of longevity and good luck, and legend has it that anyone who folds 1,000 origami cranes will be granted a wish by a crane. But in 1955, the crane added something new to its portfolio, it also became an international symbol of peace.

That year, a decade after the bombing of Hiroshima, Japan, during World War II, Sadako Sasaki, a twelve year old resident of Hiroshima was diagnosed with radiation poisoning. Knowing the legends about the crane and its origami incarnations, Sadako began folding cranes in hopes her wish for health would be granted. She fell short of her origami goal before her death, but to honor her memory her friends and classmates continued folding until one thousand cranes were done. They also raised money to have a statue of Sadako holding aloft an origami crane installed in the Hiroshima Peace Park. Its inscription states “This is our cry, this is our prayer, peace in the world.”


 
 
 
 
This was originally posted on the facebook group Rotarian Fellowship for Population and Development (RFPD) by a fellow Rotarian.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Hans Rosling
Global health expert; data visionary
 
In Hans Rosling’s hands, data sings. Global trends in health and economics come to vivid life. And the big picture of global development—with some surprisingly good news—snaps into sharp focus.
 
 
 
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Fighting Human Trafficking
and
Modern Slavery With Love
 
 
 
 
 
 
A prison-toilet-paper rose. Imagine you longed so deeply for love that a gift like this--sent from a trafficker with a message not to tell investigators what hell he inflicted--bonded you to him.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Re-creation of a piece of evidence from a case in Pennsylvania
 
 
 
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Rotary Serving Our Community
Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA)
 
 
 
Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA), is Rotary's leadership training program for young people. Held each April in Ojai California at Camp Ramah, Rotary District 5240 RYLA is four days of leadership activities.
 
The Rotary E-Club of One World sponsored two students from Arvin High School for the 20-23 April 2017 event.  Pictured with Past President Susan Weaver above are Natalie Garza and Gerardo "Jerry" Aguilar.
 
 
 
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Patriotism & Peace in the U.S. after 9/11:
Lessons from Antiwar Veterans & Military Families - Part 1
"The Presentation"
 
 
Dr. Lisa Leitz is  an Assistant Professor and the incoming Chair of Peace Studies at Chapman University, and she is affiliated with the Sociology Department.  She is currently Chair of the American Sociological Association Peace, War, & Social Conflict Section. Her research focuses on the role of identity and culture in attempts to make social change and address injustice. Her book,  Fighting for Peace: Veterans and Military Families in the Anti-Iraq War Movement, was published in the University of Minnesota Press’s Social Movements, Protest and Contention Series & won the 2015 American Sociological Association's Peace, War and Social Conflict Outstanding Book Award.  Her Social Problems article related to this research, “Oppositional Identities: The Military Peace Movement’s Challenge to Pro-Iraq War Frames” won the 2012  American Sociological Association's Peace, War and Social Conflict Outstanding Article Award. Dr. Leitz has also published about emotions in activism around infanticide, feminist organizing in the Middle East, gendered components of the American military, United States veterans’ health, women’s peace activism in the U.S. and physical fighting among middle school girls. Her ongoing research examines U.S. militarization and veterans’ reintegration post 9/11.
 
 
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Patriotism & Peace in the U.S. after 9/11:
Lessons from Antiwar Veterans & Military Families - Part 2
"The Discussion"
 
 
Dr. Lisa Leitz is  an Assistant Professor and the incoming Chair of Peace Studies at Chapman University, and she is affiliated with the Sociology Department.  She is currently Chair of the American Sociological Association Peace, War, & Social Conflict Section. Her research focuses on the role of identity and culture in attempts to make social change and address injustice. Her book,  Fighting for Peace: Veterans and Military Families in the Anti-Iraq War Movement, was published in the University of Minnesota Press’s Social Movements, Protest and Contention Series & won the 2015 American Sociological Association's Peace, War and Social Conflict Outstanding Book Award.  Her Social Problems article related to this research, “Oppositional Identities: The Military Peace Movement’s Challenge to Pro-Iraq War Frames” won the 2012  American Sociological Association's Peace, War and Social Conflict Outstanding Article Award. Dr. Leitz has also published about emotions in activism around infanticide, feminist organizing in the Middle East, gendered components of the American military, United States veterans’ health, women’s peace activism in the U.S. and physical fighting among middle school girls. Her ongoing research examines U.S. militarization and veterans’ reintegration post 9/11.
 
 
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Wade Nomura
 
 
 
This week's program features the host of "Rotary Serving our Community" and Past District 5240 Governor Wade Nomura presenting "Rotary Then and Now."  "Rotary Serving our Community" is a series of videos produced by WeAreRotary.TV on numerous Rotary topics as well as community and international projects undertaken by Rotarians and Rotary clubs inside and outside District 5240.
 
 
 
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Peter Albert David Singer, AC (born 6 July 1946) is an Australian moral philosopher. He is the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, and a Laureate Professor at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the University of Melbourne. He specializes in applied ethics and approaches ethical issues from a secular, utilitarian perspective. He is known in particular for his book Animal Liberation (1975), in which he argues in favor of vegetarianism, and his essay Famine, Affluence, and Morality, in which he argues in favor of donating to help the global poor. For most of his career, he was a preference utilitarian, but he announced in The Point of View of the Universe (2014) that he had become a hedonistic utilitarian.
 
On two occasions, Singer served as chair of the philosophy department at Monash University, where he founded its Centre for Human Bioethics. In 1996 he stood unsuccessfully as a Greens candidate for the Australian Senate. In 2004 Singer was recognized as the Australian Humanist of the Year by the Council of Australian Humanist Societies, and in 2006 he was voted one of Australia's ten most influential public intellectuals. Singer is a cofounder of Animals Australia and the founder of The Life You Can Save.
 
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NOTE:  If you are viewing this Program in the eBulletin
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Comments:
 
 
 
 
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by Robb Willer
Ph.D., Cornell University, 2006
M.A., Cornell University, 2004
B.A., University of Iowa, 1999
 
 
 
Robb Willer is a Professor in the Departments of Sociology, Psychology (by courtesy), and the Graduate School of Business (by courtesy) at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from Cornell University and his B.A. in Sociology from the University of Iowa. He previously taught at the University of California, Berkeley.
 
Professor Willer's teaching and research focus on the bases of social order. One line of his research investigates the factors driving the emergence of collective action, norms, solidarity, generosity, and status hierarchies. In other research, he explores the social psychology of political attitudes, including the effects of fear, prejudice, and masculinity in contemporary U.S. politics. Most recently, his work has focused on morality, studying how people reason about what is right and wrong and the social consequences of their judgments. His research involves various empirical and theoretical methods, including laboratory and field experiments, surveys, direct observation, archival research, physiological measurement, agent-based modeling, and social network analysis.
 
Willer's research has appeared in such journals as the American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Annual Review of Sociology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, Administrative Science Quarterly, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences. He has received grants from the National Science Foundation, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. His work has received paper awards from the American Sociological Association's sections on Social Psychology, Altruism, Morality, and Social Solidarity, Mathematical Sociology, Peace, War, and Social Conflict, and Rationality and Society.
 
His research has also received widespread media coverage including from the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, the Washington Post, Science, Nature, Time, U.S. News and World Report, Scientific American, Harper's, Slate, CNN, NBC Nightly News, The Today Show, and National Public Radio.
 
Willer was the 2009 recipient of the Golden Apple Teaching award, the only teaching award given by UC-Berkeley's student body.
 
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presented by Michael Fishbach
 
When Michael Fischbach and his family saw Valentina, they first thought she was dead. But when they got closer, they realised the great whale was still breathing. The fins and tail of Valentina were wrapped in fishing lines which dragged her down. The only way to save her, was to cut her free of the fishing net. Michael and his family succeeded and Valentina was very grateful. The event changed Michael's life. To make sure the great whales will survive all the threats they face today, he founded The Great Whale Conservancy (GWC) to speak and work on behalf of these magnificent animals.
 
 
Protecting the World’s Great Whales and their Habitat
 
 
 
 
 
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(Note:  I first posted this Program nearly two years ago about a speech I recorded at my first Rotary International Convention in 1985.  This speech is still one of my favorites and make me feel all Rotary inside.)
 

Does the title sound familiar?  Yes, it was the 2013-2014 Rotary International Theme introduced by now PRIP Sakuji Tanaka - Peace Through Service.  However, I first heard those three words almost 32 years ago when I had the opportunity to attend my first Rotary International Convention held in Kansas City, Missouri from 26-29 May 1985.
 
Excited about my first Convention, I brought along my Sony handheld audio cassette recorder (cutting edge technology in 1985) to record the many great speeches I was sure to hear and I was not disappointed.  This Convention was the 80th anniversary Convention and was also where “Polio 2005" was first introduced to the Rotary world and shortly thereafter was renamed “Polio Plus,” our effort to eradicate polio throughout the world.  You will hear reference to Polio 2005 in the recording that follows.
 
The following speech, entitled “Peace Though Service,” was given on the morning of the last day of the Convention by the late PDG L. S. “Skip” Kreidler from Tulsa, Oklahoma.  I have listened to this speech numerous times over the years and shared it with other Rotarians.  I am always amazed at the timelessness of this speech given so long ago and I still find it inspirational, educational, entertaining and a reminder of our purpose as Rotarians.  PDG Skip was a fine Rotarian and I hope you enjoy his timeless message as much as I have.
 
Google helped me find the entire 1985 Proceedings of the Seventy-Sixth Annual Convention of Rotary International.  The entire transcript of Skip’s speech was included and starts below. The recording starts where indicated in the introduction by RI President Carlos Canseco.
 
Enjoy!
 
 
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Women, Children and Youngsters - PeaceBuilders in Colombia
 
The Rotary Clubs of Bogotá Centenario and Simi Sunrise invite you to bring hope and the tools of peace to a region desperately in need.

Since 1964, the government of Colombia has been engaged in a brutal internal armed conflict with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). More than 220,000 people have been killed and another 8 million people have been victimized by the conflict. Anyone younger than 52 has only known war in their lifetime.

Global Grant 1636958 benefits 500 women and children of all ages in the communities of Soacha and Ibagué, near Bogota, Colombia. This $91,000 (USD) grant is sponsored by Rotary Districts 4281 (Colombia) and 5240 (California, USA). There are two non-government organizations that will serve as cooperating partners in the grant’s training effort. They are Mediators Beyond Borders International (MBBI) and MENCOLDES, the Mennonite Colombian Foundation for Development that has worked on human rights issues in Colombia for 40 years.

The grant provides for a Vocational Training Team (VTT) to travel to Colombia and create and conduct training workshops based on United Nations Resolution 1325, the resolution that encourages the role of women in peacemaking efforts. Catalina Chaux, a Colombian lawyer who lives and works in Toronto, Canada, will serve as the team leader for the VTT.
 
 
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Over the last few years, publications such as the Guardian, Scientific American and the Brookings Institution have headlined a conclusion that Past District 5240 Governor Deepa Willingham reached long ago — to change the world for the better, to save the planet, and lift up communities from abject poverty you have to educate the girls.  It is the best investment you can make and promises the highest rewards. 

 

 
 
 
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Global Grant for Early Childhood Education in Rural Sri Lanka
presented by Hans and Helena Dahlin
 
 
 
 
 
The Rotary Club of Goleta Noontime is sponsoring – as International Partner – a Global Grant for helping preschool teachers in Rural Sri Lanka to get them the needed education that will lead to a diploma in early childhood education.

We are proud to have been asked to take the lead on this project for the last three years, and are working closely with past district governor Dharshan John (Sri Lanka D-3220) and Colombo East as the Host Club.

Since the project start, D-5240 together with three other districts has helped educate 2,000 teachers with a total budget of $220,000. This will benefit 40,000 children annually.
 
History
The Sri Lankan Civil War was an ongoing armed conflict that lasted for over 25 years. The war caused significant hardships for the population, environment and the economy. The war ended in 2009. The vast majority of the fighting took place in the North and the East Coast.
On top of that, the country was also hit by the devastating Tsunami in 2004 killing more than 35,000 people and leaving many more homeless. This is why poverty is more obvious in the Eastern part of the country and the most help is needed.

Being part of this project and building bridges between the West and the East coast makes us feel like peace builders.
 
 
Location
 
Sri Lanka is located in South East Asia, south of India. Sri Lanka has typically a tropical climate and there are no real marked seasons. The weather is very hot and humid. Sri Lanka sees a lot of rainfall. The monsoon brings rain from May to July to the western, southern and central regions of the island. The north-east monsoon causes rains in the northern and eastern regions in December and January.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Let me introduce you to Leslie Clark, who is among the most adventurous people I have had the pleasure to know.  An honorary member of the Rotary Club of Ojai, Leslie is the force behind The Nomad Foundation.  

The story of the Nomad Foundation begins with Leslie’s reading the book 'The Nomads of Niger' by Carol van Beckwith.  Fascinated, Leslie packed her bags and set off to see Niger and to get to know the nomads for herself undeterred by the fact that the country was in a state of rebellion.  

During that first trip she met a Wodaabi family who, despite their humble circumstances, welcomed her with legendary nomadic hospitality. Their warmth and kindness so touched Leslie that when she returned a year later, she presented them with a cow to show her appreciation. On her third trip to Niger, Leslie learned from her grateful Wodaabi friends that without her gift they would have been forced to give up their nomadic life and move to the city to scratch out a living.  Struck by the enormous impact on their lives of what was for her a relatively small contribution, Leslie had what we Rotarians might call a “Rotary Moment” and she returned home to start the Nomad Foundation. She enlisted friends and organized fundraisers.  An artist, Leslie captured the beauty, grace and romance of the nomads, and used a portion of her sales to finance the work of the foundation.  

Then, in 2005, Niger was struck with famine.  For Leslie, friendships made this a personal event and she began contacting everyone she knew to raise money for relief programs.  Her efforts gained real traction when 'The Ventura County Star' published an article about her work in Niger on the same day as news of the famine was headlined in the New York Times and LA Times. Donations to the Nomad Foundation came flooding in - $50,000 in two weeks.   

Since those early days, The Nomad Foundation has partnered with Rotary on several programs through the years.  Our E-Club has made small financial contributions to two of these efforts - the midwife training project and the microcredit program for at-risk youth.  This new District Grant proposal to build a middle school for nomad youths is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Westlake Village Sunrise and seeks both cash contributions and district designated funds.
 
 
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Note:  This "Program" was originally posted by our, now Honorary, member and Rotary Peace Fellow Lisa Dittmar in January 2015.  I found it extremely interesting and worth a revisit.  I hope you enjoy it and find it as interesting as I did.
 
 
Lisa Ditmar - Rotary Peace Fellow
 
One of the world’s greatest challenges in the 21st century is to ensure we can grow enough food for everyone while safeguarding the long term viability of the planet. The global food system currently leaves 870 million people hungry and accounts for approximately 20% of greenhouse gas emissions, so we must learn to grow more, with less. As Rotarians, we need to keep environmental concerns in mind when running projects. Why? Sustainability can also be thought of as intergenerational equality – we do not want to take from future generations in order to sustain current ones.
 
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A Rotary Peace Fellow "Doing Good in the World."
 
 
 
 
Anne Kjær Riechert is a 2006 graduate from the prestigious social innovation and change management education KaosPilot in Denmark. From 2006-2009 she worked as creative lead and corporate social responsibility consultant for the Copenhagen-based brand strategy company Stoic, where she, among others, developed and implemented Samsung Electronics award-winning CSR strategy for Scandinavia.

In July 2010, Anne moved to Japan, when she was awarded the prestigious Rotary Peace Fellowship to the International Christian University in Tokyo. In 2012 Anne was recognized by Berlingske Business Magazine as one of Denmarks' 10 largest talents under 35 years, in the "Business Development" category.

In 2012 Anne moved to Berlin to set up the Berlin Peace Innovation Lab in collaboration with Stanford University. The lab focuses on how technology is facilitating emerging and measurable social change toward global peace.

In response to the refugee crises, Anne co-founded Refugees on Rails in the summer of 2015, to help integrate refugees in to the European tech scene. The project later developed in to a vocational training program teaching basic and advanced programming skills to asylum seekers to get them job ready. Since January 2016 Anne is managing director of the program, called "ReDI School of Digital Integration".
 
(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).
 
 
 
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An Insight, An Idea with Michael Sandel
 
 
 
 
 
Michael Sandel teaches political philosophy at Harvard University. His writings-on justice, ethics, democracy, and markets--have been translated into 27 languages. His course "Justice" is the first Harvard course to be made freely available online and on television.  It has been viewed by tens of millions of people around the world, including in China, where Sandel was named the "most influential foreign figure of the year." (China Newsweek)
 
Sandel has been a visiting professor at the Sorbonne, and delivered the Tanner Lectures on Human Values at Oxford, the BBC's Reith Lectures, and the Kellogg Lecture on Jurisprudence at the U.S. Library of Congress.  In 2016, East China Normal University (Shanghai) convened an international conference to explore points of contact between Sandel's work and the Confucian tradition.
 
Sandel has sought to extend the reach of philosophy beyond the academy. His BBC Radio 4 series "The Public Philosopher" explores the philosophical ideas lying behind the headlines with audiences around the world; one program, a discussion of violence against women, was recorded in India, following a notorious rape incident in New Delhi. Another took place in Britain's Palace of Westminster, where Sandel led a debate about democracy with members of Parliament and the public.  In Brazil, he recently led a debate on corruption and the ethics of everyday life that reached an audience of 19 million on Globo TV.  In Japan, his series on ethics for NHK, Japan's national television network, convened students from China, Japan, and South Korea to discuss whether moral responsibility for historic wrongs extends across generations.
 
Sandel has been a pioneer in the use of new technology to promote global public discourse.  In a new BBC series, "The Global Philosopher," Sandel leads video-linked discussions with participants from over 30 countries on the ethical aspects of issues such as immigration and climate change.
 
In the U.S., Sandel has served on the President's Council on Bioethics and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A graduate of Brandeis University, he received his doctorate from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.
 
Sandel's global lectures have taken him across five continents and packed venues such as St. Paul's Cathedral (London), the Sydney Opera House (Australia), the Public Theater in New York's Central Park, and an outdoor stadium in Seoul (S. Korea), where 14,000 people came to hear him speak.
 
 
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High School to College and Beyond

With a scandalously low 59 percent of undergraduates in the USA earning bachelor’s degrees in six years, the rest are departing with no degree, sizable debt and weak job prospects, some might argue that our system is broken or needs some change.

How many of you (U.S. citizens and others) were taught practical skills like budgeting in school?  Did you always know what you wanted to be when you grew up?

Take these three words,  “Major”, “College”, “Career” and put them in order of how most high school students make their decisions.

If you’re like most - the decision is usually:
1) College
2) Major
3) Career

However, what would happen if young adults would flip the college decision-making paradigm.   Watch this 5 minute video.  As you will hear/see the education system looks differently around the world.
 
(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).
 
 
 
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Realizing that getting children into schools isn't
enough to solve illiteracy, Rotary shifts to
mentoring and coaching teachers
 
On Carolyn Johnson’s second visit to the central highlands of Guatemala, she met a first-grade teacher who made a shocking confession. Before taking part in the Guatemala Literacy Project, the teacher was convinced that her students could not learn to read.
 
“She said ‘We were willing to go through the program because it was a day out of class and you gave us books and you provided us with a nice lunch, but we knew that you were crazy,’ ” says Johnson, a Rotarian who helped design the curriculum for the project and now serves as a technical adviser for the Guatemala Literacy Project.
 
That teacher and more than a hundred of her colleagues each received several in-classroom coaching sessions over eight months. They learned how to replace rote memorization drills and repetition of words on a blackboard with exercises that engage their students in critical thinking.

“She went on to tell me excitedly how 45 of her 50 students were moving on to second grade because they had learned to read,” Johnson says. “The program has made believers out of 90 percent of the teachers we have worked with. They are excited about being teachers again, and they go into their classrooms believing they can make a difference.”

After decades of investing in literacy projects, experts have realized that simply getting children into the classroom — either by removing attendance barriers or providing supplies — is not enough. Before students can succeed, the quality of the teaching in that classroom needs to improve.
 
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Image result for polio 2005 images
 
 
The idea for Rotary to undertake the eradication polio throughout the world was first introduced at the 1985 RI Convention, held in Kansas Cith, MO, by 1984-85 RI President Dr. Carlos Canseco.  The Polio 2005 Project was to immunize all the children of the world by the 100th anniversary of Rotary.
 
In his President’s Address to the Convention, President Carlos stated in part:
 
“. . .I envision this program, a magnificent program, that will touch the hearts of every mother or father of the world. We can bring the hope for a better life for these children, while at the same time we are going to bring education along with it. And in some years—I don't know when—we might reach the goal that Rotary has set for it—peace, goodwill, and understanding.

I have been talking about discovery today. I have outlined what I consider to be the five great discoveries of Rotary: International expansion, The Rotary Foundation, Youth service, the 3-H Program, and the latest—and perhaps most exciting—the Polio 2005 plan.
 
Image result for polio 2005 images
But this cannot be accomplished by only one Rotary club, one district. It has to be a commitment of all the Rotary clubs in the world and all the communities and all the countries, and everybody who has a desire to do something for Rotary. . .”
 
This was the first time Rotary had undertaken a global fundraising effort.  The Polio 2005 Project was renamed PolioPlus the following year.
 
 
Thanks to Rotary, UNICEF and partners' global immunization and vaccine efforts, polio has almost-but not quite-disappeared. In 1988 there were 350,000 cases; in 2012, only 223. In 2014, India joined the ranks of the polio-free, a major achievement thanks to lifesaving polio vaccines, and in 2015, Nigeria reached a milestone when it went a full year without a single case of polio.  Sadly, after more than two years without the detection of wild polio in Nigeria, the Government reported three laboratory confirmed wild polio virus type one (WPV1) cases with onset between July and August 2016.  Total reported cases in 2016 was 35.
 
But the highly-infectious, crippling and often fatal disease, to which children under 5 are particularly vulnerable, remains endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and is known to resurface in countries in conflict, where health systems are disrupted. Continued support for vaccinations remains vital.
 
1992-93 RI President Cliff Dochterman Shares the Origins of Rotary International's Polio Plus global immunization Program.
 
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Why I'm rowing across the Pacific
by Roz Savage
 
Image result for roz savage images
 
 
A latecomer to the life of adventure, Roz Savage worked as a management consultant in London for 11 years before setting out in a new life direction -- in a rowboat across the Atlantic Ocean. She completed her solo row across the Atlantic in 2005 and is now on a mission be the first woman to row solo across the Pacific, from the West Coast of the US to Australia, raising awareness along the way of plastic pollution, climate change and eco-heroism.. She began the pursuit in 2008, rowing from California to Hawaii, and rowed from Hawaii to Kiribati in 2009. In April 2010 she began the third and final stage of her Pacific row, from Kiribati to Australia.
 
When not on the open seas, Roz is a passionate environmental campaigner, focused on sustainability and ending plastic pollution.  Why does she do it? Hear her reasons, both deeply personal and urgently activist.
 
 
 
 
 
 
(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).
 
 
 
 
Please share your thoughts or comments below.
 
 

 
 
 
 
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It is fascinating that people handle life’s challenges in many different ways.
 
What is resilience?  Are you born with it?  Can you cultivate it? Some people have called resilience, GRIT, Determination, Perseverance. Resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress. It means "bouncing back" from difficult experiences.
 
Why do some people handle the death of a loved one or a life threatening illness and move on and others never seem to get over it?  How do you deal with difficult events in your life?
 
 
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     DG Nick Frankle & Heather
 
 
We enjoyed great fellowship and an inspiring presentation with our District 5240 Governor Nick Frankle at our special Zoom meeting on Saturday, 19 November.  Governor Nick shared with us some of his memorable Rotary experiences since becoming a member of the Rotary Club of Westlake Village Sunrise in 2002.  Nick served as club president during Rotary Year 2006-07 and at the end of his year as president, the club was selected the best medium club in District 5240.  Both Nick and his wife Heather, who joined Nick's Rotary club in 2008, have served in many club and District positions.
 
One of the stories Nick told during his presentation was the day he became a Rotarian and it involved an Orange.  He told us this story because it described how just one person can make a difference in someone's life.
 
After his presentation, Governor Nick recognized OWR member Tamara Thorn for receiving her PHF+4 pin and cited the good Tamara has made possible in so many ways around the world as the result of her contributions to The Rotary Foundation.  Congratulations and WELL DONE Tamara!
 
Governor Nick's theme for this year is,
 
 
 
Please enjoy Governor Nick's message in the video below. It will make you proud to be a One World Rotarian!
 
 
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by Jonathan Haidt
 
 
How can the US recover after the negative, partisan presidential election of 2016? Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt studies the morals that form the basis of our political choices. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, he describes the patterns of thinking and historical causes that have led to such sharp divisions in America -- and provides a vision for how the country might move forward.
 
 
 
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In mid-October, along with four members of the Rotary Club of Ojai, I traveled to Stolac, Bosna i Herzegovina, to visit the Global Grant project to which One World Rotary has extended financial support.   The grant was written to provide an economic development project for women in rural Bosna i Herzegovina (BiH) by providing financing and technical support to train 30 unemployed women to cultivate tomatoes, dry and package them for sale.   The  Rotary Club of Ojai is the grant international sponsor and the Rotary Club of Mostar is its local sponsor.  Our partner private non-profit, Urdruženje Orhideja Stolac is a women’s cöoperative.  A distinctive feature of this grant is that the project seeks not only to reduce the grinding poverty that still afflicts the area 20 years after the civil war which ravaged it, but to serve as model of reconciliation as Bosniak, Serb and Croat residents work side-by-side in this cöoperative effort to pull themselves up by their bootstraps.

 
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War isn’t inevitable, and it’s not the best or even a particularly good way of dealing with conflicts. With more than 20 years’ experience working in many of the worst war zones in the world, Kai Brand-Jacobsen shares what is being done every day to deal with conflicts practically, prevent violence, and help communities and people heal after war.
 
Kai Brand-Jacobsen has been described as “one of the leading pioneers, innovators and practitioners in the field of PeaceBuilding and dealing with conflicts and crisis in the world today.”  For 20 years he has worked across all continents and many of the most challenging war zones and crisis situations in the world.  He is the Executive Director of the Department of Peace Operations of PATRIR and the UN supported Nineveh Paths to Peace project in Nineveh, Iraq (KRG), one of the areas worst affected by the ongoing war with ISIS.
 
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World Polio Day is observed on October 24. This observance was established by Rotary International in order to commemorate the birth of Jonas Salk, the developer of a vaccine against polio.
 
Poliomyelitis was known since the ancient times, but the first clinical description of the disease was provided only by English physician Michael Underwood in 1789. The virus struck the developed countries at the end of the 19th century, at the beginning of the 20th century it appeared in the USA and Europe. The disease reached its peak during the 1950s, when it started to shift from infants to children aged from five to nine.
 
Polio affects the further life of those children who once suffered it. The first efficient attempts to fight the virus were made by Jonas Salk in 1955, who lead the first team to develop and test the inactivated vaccine.
 
Salk's inactivated vaccine and Sabin's oral vaccine helped save thousands children. The use of the vaccines led to establishment of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, that reduced the worldwide cases of polio by 99%.
 
 
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HILARY J. CALDIS
Founder & Executive Director of The Female Voice
www.thefemalevoice.org
 
 
 
 
 
At our live Zoom meeting on 13 October, our guest speaker was Rotary International Peace Fellow Hillary Jo Caldis.  In attendance were several OWR members as well as members of the Rotary E-Club of Southern Ontario & Western New York (SOWNY).  We enjoyed conversation and fellowship before Hilary's presentation "Addressing Gender Inequality from Within."
 
Hilary's Peace Fellowship was sponsored by the Rotary Club of Minneapolis (Club 9) in D5950 and is hosted in Japan by the Rotary Club of Yokohama - Konan.
 
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Wade Nomura
 
 
 
This week's program features the host of "Rotary Serving our Community" and Past District 5240 Governor Wade Nomura presenting a historical account of Rotary from its beginnings in 1905.  "Rotary Serving our Community" is a series videos produced by WeAreRotary.TV on numerous Rotary topics as well as community and international projects undertaken by Rotarians and Rotary clubs inside and outside District 5240.
 
 
 
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Dr. Nina Smart is a human rights activist, sociologist, and author who educates people about female genital mutilation (FGM) and works to eradicate the practice in Sierra Leone, West Africa.
 
Dr. Smart’s passion for human rights, her academic expertise and unique biography, places her inside and outside of Sierra Leonean culture, allowing her to make important inroads in Sierra Leone.  In 2004, Dr. Smart founded Servicing Wild Flowers –SWF International, a Los Angeles based non-profit NGO that raises awareness about FGM through lectures and presentations for students and socially conscious groups.  She works directly in rural areas of Sierra Leone, together with SWF partners, who facilitate community meetings. Her organization supports projects that protect children and women and empower families.  SWF provided assistance during the Ebola crisis.
 
Women Empowerment Initiative at the University of California, Irvine, where she completed her doctoral studies, launched her memoir, Wild Flower – the True Story of a Romanian Girl in Africa, in November 2014. Dr. Smart’s book is used at numerous Universities across the US to teach courses in the social sciences, peace and conflict studies, literary composition, media, law and society, education and women’s studies.
 
Dr. Smart straddles many cultures—Romanian, American, West African, academia and activism. She has built bridges between these worlds and through her tireless efforts is educating people, unveiling the systemic causes of FGM in Sierra Leone, and is creating a safer space for women in the communities she works and lives in.
 
A proud Soroptimist and enthusiastic volunteer in both African and Romanian communities, Dr. Nina Smart was chosen as 2016 ‘Woman of the Year’ for her non-profit work by Senator Mendoza of California and honored by the United States Congress.  Dr. Smart inspires and moves others to action by offering opportunities to collaborate on effective solutions to end FGM in a non-violent way.
 
 
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The legendary social psychologist Dr. Philip Zimbardo has done some trailblazing research on heroism which he has described as altruism that involves a serious risk.

Overall, Phil’s work suggests that everyday people like you and me have the capacity to perform heroic deeds.  Have you ever felt pulled to be heroic?  How’s your heroic imagination?
 
 
 
 
 
What Makes a Hero?
 
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On her recent trip to Japan with her husband Mike, Immediate Past President Susan Weaver had the opportunity to meet with members of our first "Twin" club the Rotary E-Club of Tokyo Peace Wing.  At that gathering of Rotarians, Susan had the pleasure of meeting two Rotary International Peace Fellows who are studying at the International Christian University (ICU) in Tokyo.
 
One of those Peace Fellows was Madeleine Logan from Brisbane Australia.  Madeleine was nominated for her Peace Fellowship by the Rotary Club of  Ashgrove-The Gap near Brisbane and she is a M.A Candidate in Peace Studies.
 
You are going to love learning about Madeleine and the intercultural educational project called Safarni.
 
 
 
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The Rotary Club of Ojai, California, sponsored two grants in 2016 to benefit the village children of Prashanti International School in Puri, Odisha, India. The first grant was a 3-way joint project with the participation of Rotary Club of Ojai, the Rotary Club of Sri Jagannath Dham, local to Puri, and World Family Foundation (WFF), an Ojai-based non-profit. This grant provided clean drinking water for the children. The second grant was a District Grant created by RC Ojai.  In this grant, laptop computers and other needed items were provided for the school.  RC Ojai club member Leslie Bouché explains how these projects came about, what they entailed, and who are the beneficiaries of the grants. All photos were taken by Leslie or by one of the WFF board members.
 
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To Make Peace, Get Angry

Anger may seem to be in opposition to peace, but this is not necessarily so.  Anger can be a great motivator and it need not lead to violence. How one channels their anger is all important.

 

 
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A great way to learn about other cultures--whether in history or in another community or nation--is to look at the art they value. Recently I took a day trip to New York City, just a couple of hours away from my PA home by train. 

"The City" or "The Big Apple," as NYC is sometimes called, is a living piece of art itself. The skyscrapers are superlative.

 

 

 
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My Rotary is the part of Rotary.org for all Rotarians.  Whether you are new to Rotary or an old timer like me, My Rotary is the place for members, club leaders, district leaders and even the RI President and Staff.  Last week I featured the "public site" of Rotary.org in my President's Message and if you missed it, I have included a rerun below.  This Public Site Video Tour is designed to inform non-Rotarians of the many great things that Rotary does around the world and how to get involved.  This is where to direct someone who asks "what's Rotary all about and why should I join."

 

(If you cannot see the video below on your device, click here).

 

 
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WHAT IS AWE?

How is it universal across cultures?

You might experience awe when you see a baby being born.   Or you might notice a sense of awe when viewing a Natural Wonder.   AWE is defined as a feeling of reverential respect mixed with fear and wonder.  It may surprise you to know that research indicates that AWE provides positive health benefits, improves cognitive abilities and encourages us to be our better, more generous selves. 

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On 30 July we held our first Board meeting of the year.  I sincerely want to thank the members of the 2016-17 OWR Board for their commitment to the Rotary E-Club of One World and their dedication to service.  In attendance at our first meeting were:

Immediate Past President Susan Weaver, Ojai, CA
President-Elect Michael Cavitt, Seattle, WA
Secretary Nancy Falconer, Simi Valley, CA
Treasurer Maria Berntson, Ventura, CA
Club Service Director David Wood, Bethlehem, NH
Vocational Service Director Ken Meyer, Vidalia, LA
International Service Director Thoko Mkwanazi, Springhill, TN
Webmaster Nabil Bedewi, Potomac, MD
President Michael Henstra, Lake Isabella, CA.

Unable to attend were:

President-Elect Nominee Amina Sammo, Accra, Ghana
Foundation Chair Dr. Roberto León, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
Membership Chair Viktor Cytra, Trail, BC, Canada.

The Board meeting was conducted via Zoom video conferencing.  Many traditional and Rotary E-Clubs around the world are using Zoom for committee and special meetings. I am looking forward to using Zoom this year for Board, committee and fellowship meetings to get better acquainted and learn more about one another.  Using Zoom, we are planning to interview members for classification/craft talks and have special "live" meetings with guest speakers.

Through the magic of Zoom, please take this opportunity to meet the 2016-17 OWR Board!

 

 
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Are you an honest person?” 

Nearly all of us will answer “yes” to this question. And yet - to be completely honest - when pressed, we would have to admit that complete honesty is a hard bar to clear.  Few of us have never told a “little white lie,” whether to save face or to spare the feelings of another person.  There have been several funny movies based on this premise ( Liar, Liar; and The Invention of Lying to name but two).  

 
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Smartphones Are Turning People Into Zombies! Here's how to save them.

Do you use your smartphone and other tech devices intelligently, responsibly and sparingly? Then congratulations, this interview isn't for you! But if you (or someone you know) find yourself distracted by your fondleslab and feel anxious when you're not able to check your latest notifications, then it's time to admit that the technology is starting to control you. Today we talk to research psychologist Dr. Larry Rosen about how our technology is turning us into Pavlov's dog and how we can regain control over our devices and our lives.

 

 
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Weather wise, month-by-month, the first half of 2016 is the hottest on record according to the NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, and the news has been filled with extreme events - wildfires in California and Alberta, Canada, flooding in West Virginia and Paris, super typhoon Nepartak wreaking havoc in Asia.  But while these high-profile effects of climate change capture our attention for the news cycle, there are much more subtle changes occurring in the more remote, less populated places in the world.  Though less dramatically so, these effects are as disruptive to the lives of the people who are having to adapt to them.

 
 
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For those of us of a “certain age,” what we call that “certain age” can be a touchy subject as I was reminded when I recently attended the Old-timers Game at Dodger Stadium.  Old-timer conjures up an image with which at least one of the “old-timers” in attendance did not identify. Jerry Hairston, Jr., a 40-something youngster in a group whose oldest members were over 80, suggested that they all be referred to as “legacy players.”  Several players who took the field were well into their 60s, still fit and active enough to play a decent game of baseball and slug a ball 375 feet to the left field fence of Dodger Stadium. They certainly did not fit the grizzled image that the label “old-timer” tends to conjure up.
 
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What can we do to minimize what divides us and emphasize what unites us as world citizens?   A first step is to better know each other and understand our situations and challenges.
 
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All around the world, we have had our share of extreme weather events so far in 2016.  Certainly that is the case here in Southern California, where we are in the midst of a multi-year drought. In the last few weeks we have had unseasonably hot weather and strong winds - a prescription for trouble.
 
 
 
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All I can do is tell their stories:
People doing their part to help enslaved Yazidi women
 

In the news last week, it was reported that Lawyer and activist Amal Clooney (married to George Clooney) will represent the women who have been enslaved and trafficked by ISIS in the Yazidi genocide. Clooney, a barrister who specializes in international law and human rights law, plans to seek an International Criminal Court investigation and prosecution of crimes against the Yazidi ethnic and religious minority, Women in the World reports.
 
Many have hear about the plight of the Yazidi (if you haven't, click here for a video talking about it). This week, we are profiling people who are doing something about the tragedy. We bring you three stories, the first by one of our very own peace fellows. Her story was highlighted in the February 2016 issue of the Rotarian.
 
 
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One of our very own One World Rotarians, Carol Metzker, recently traveled to Seoul for the International Rotary Convention to give a presentation on present-day slavery. Many of you saw her TEDx talk that we featured as a Rotary program several weeks ago. If you missed it, you can find it here. While at the convention, she took a number of photos to share with the rest of us. Thanks Carol!
 
 
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Among the many outstanding presentations given at the Presidents Elect Training Seminar (PETS) that I attended in February, I especially found the story told by Nancy Hughes to be particularly enlightening and inspiring.  I had no idea what severe problems the everyday task of cooking has caused in Central America and other undeveloped countries.
 
Smoke from indoor cooking fires kills more people than AIDS and eight times as many as malaria. It is the leading cause of death of children under age five. This killer is virtually unknown as its victims are women and children.
 
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ARE YOU READY?
 
GET EXCITED!!! This is the biggest and best time of year for Rotary: the International Convention! This year it is being hosted in Seoul, South Korea. This program is to help us all share in the festivities, entertainment, and Rotary love.
 
Who is going? Comment below if you are going, and what you plan to see while there! 
 
(If you cannot see the video below, click here).
 
 
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This week's program is brought to you by our very own Carol Metzker, who recently spoke at TEDx WestChester!
 
The Slave Down the Street
 
What if one day you found out that victims of human trafficking were toiling in your neighborhood? Would you believe it? Would you do something to make a difference?
 
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Thanks to Michael Henstra for suggesting this week's program!
 
Hugh Evans started a movement that mobilizes "global citizens," people who self-identify first and foremost not as members of a state, nation or tribe but as members of the human race. In this uplifting and personal talk, learn more about how this new understanding of our place in the world is galvanizing people to take action in the fights against extreme poverty, climate change, gender inequality and more. "These are ultimately global issues," Evans says, "and they can only be solved by global citizens demanding global solutions from their leaders."
 
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This week we bring you two interesting and related resources on observing and changing bad habits. 
 
First we bring you psychiatrist Judson Brewer, who studies the relationship between mindfulness and addiction. He tries to answer the question: Can we break bad habits by being more curious about them? From smoking to overeating to all those other things we do even though we know they're bad for us, can we do something about it? Learn more about the mechanism of habit development and discover a simple but profound tactic that might help you beat your next urge to smoke, snack or check a text while driving.
 
Then, we bring you a blog post from Eric Barker from Barking up the Wrong Tree, a blog that uses science-based answers and expert insight on how to be awesome at life.
 
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This week we bring you a blog post by Eric Barker, a blogger whose site brings you science-based answers and expert insight on how to be awesome at life.  It’s been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Wired Magazine and Time Magazine.
 

I was impressed with his blog, so thought I would share a couple blog posts from it. You can check out more of his stuff here.

Hint: next week you'll also hear more from him about habits!

 
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This week, we are building on Sir Ken Robinson's talk from last week and exploring creativity in a little more depth. We will hear from a number of different cutting edge thinkers on what is creativity? How do we harness it? What creates the best environment for it? Are there specific techniques? We have also linked to a number of extended-length videos for those who find this topic particularly interesting.
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- See more at: http://www.oneworldrotary.org/Stories/war-child-protecting-childhood-in-war-zones#sthash.khti8QVy.dpuf
REGISTER My Attendance
 
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- See more at: http://www.oneworldrotary.org/Stories/war-child-protecting-childhood-in-war-zones#sthash.khti8QVy.dpuf
 
 
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This RSA Animate was adapted from a talk given at the RSA by Sir Ken Robinson, world-renowned education and creativity expert and recipient of the RSA's Benjamin Franklin award.
 
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War Child was founded in North America in 1999 by two young doctors – Samantha Nutt and Eric Hoskins. Both had worked for many years in some of the world’s toughest war zones, and had become convinced that a better, more grassroots approach to humanitarian work was possible. From the outset, Sam and Eric were committed to creating a charity that empowers local people and organizations to be the architects of their own recovery from the devastation of war. They believed passionately that communities and local leaders should be at the helm of rebuilding their countries. In their view, the role of organizations such as War Child is to enable, rather than drive, that process.
 

War Child grew from a volunteer base of one - Sam – equipped with a cell phone and a one room office, to what it is today: an award-winning international charity with a team of 20 based at the office headquarters in Little Italy, Toronto. The head office team provides support to over 200 staff members employed overseas, 95% of whom are local people.

 

Below is a 60 second PSA for War Child:

(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link: https://youtu.be/B3NgeuOWmtw)

 
 
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Artificial intelligence is getting smarter by leaps and bounds — within this century, research suggests, a computer AI could be as "smart" as a human being. And then, says Nick Bostrom, it will overtake us: "Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make." A philosopher and technologist, Bostrom asks us to think hard about the world we're building right now, driven by thinking machines. Will our smart machines help to preserve humanity and our values — or will they have values of their own?
 
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This week we take a look at the research behind a new social platform called UNU, which builds on the research of the collective intelligence of swarms in the animal kingdom to come up with an innovative human swarming platform.
 
(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link: https://youtu.be/gU8PoxJCVq0)
 
 
 
 
 
 
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St Patrick's Day is celebrated in many countries of the world. It is now a very secular holiday, characterized by four-leaf clovers, leprechauns, pots of gold, and festivities at your local Irish pub. This week, we give you a brief history of St Patrick's Day. 
 
If you have a celebration in your local country coming up, write it in the comments below! We would like to highlight other celebrations that happen globally.
 
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This week, we feature Robin Farmanfarmaian, author of The Patient as CEO, who talks about her vision for the future of healthcare.
 
Robin believes that technology can empower patients and make a positive impact in the health and medical field. This position drives her to provide education and resources to leaders, entrepreneurs, physicians, healthcare professionals and innovators to positively impact medicine and healthcare.

She focuses on the future of integrated medicine, the changing role of patients in healthcare decision-making, and how technology will change the way we experience and interact with medical facilities and physicians. She is interested in big data, wearable technology, 3D printing, and access to and the usability of personal healthcare information.

She has spoken on technology and medicine at many conferences, including Exponential Medicine, Singularity University, Connected Health Symposium, Boston Scientific, Differential Medicine, Medscape CME Videos, Burrill Personalized Medicine, LSA Innovator Summit, Wharton, and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, among others. She is Adjunct Faculty for Singularity University and a contributing writer to Wired, Forbes, Huffington Post, MedGadget, Becker’s Hospital, Fierce HealthIT, and has been published in a variety of other online publications.
 
 
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Congratulations to One World Rotarian Carol Metzker for being published in the March 2016 issue of the Rotarian Magazine. Carol's article, "Breaking the invisible chains of slavery" featured the Rotarian Action Group Against Child Slavery which grew out of the efforts of Carol and numerous other Rotarians addressing this issue.
 
The following story, "Fighting the Monster of Human Trafficking," was originally posted by Carol in May 2014 and we repost it this week as a reminder that the fight is not over.
 
(Ed. Note: Carol is a writer, speaker and author of of "Facing the Monster: How One Person Can Fight Child Slavery".  She is a member of Rotarian Action Group Against Child Slavery and a recipient of Rotary International’s highest award, Service Above Self.)

 

Introduction

The first time I heard about modern child-slavery was in 1991.


 
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Today's story is brought to you by Brenda Newman, an E-Club of One World Rotarian, who has been watching this story develop since Sept 2013, when she met Mel Duncan & Ann Frisch of the Non Violent Peace Force in Detroit Lakes. It involves some of the D5550 Rotary World Peace Partners' educational programs, and District 5550 World Peace Partners collaborates with a local university and helps sponsor students into the program. 
 
The story below was written and posted by Agou Anyieth Kur on January 28, 2016 on Community News Commons.
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Rebecca Deng is helping create the Winnipeg Women’s Resource Centre in Bor.
 
 
For Rebecca Deng and her friends in the Emanuel Mission Women’s Group, the ongoing civil war in South Sudan brought back painful memories of the previous civil war.
 
These women have called Winnipeg home for the last ten years. Most of them came to Canada through the refugee resettlement program after enduring many years of the second Sudan civil war that started in 1983 and ended with a peace accord in 2005.
 
Rebecca was just a child when the war started and because of that war, she was separated from her family when she fled to Ethiopia with thousands of children who later became known as the lost boys and girls of Sudan.
 
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As a child, Gowri Rajan was scared of trees because of the reptiles and insects lurking in their roots, branches, and leaves. "I wouldn't go near trees," says Rajan. "It's ironic that, later in life, a tree would be the reason I'm still alive."
 
On the morning of 26 December 2004, a tsunami slammed into Rajan's vacation house on the Indian Ocean in Sri Lanka, where her family and a few friends were staying for the holidays. The water violently crashed through the house, destroying everything inside. "I said my last prayers. I thought this was the end," she recalls.
 
When the water receded, it swept Rajan with it. But she saved herself by grabbing onto one of the few trees that hadn't been uprooted. "For 20 minutes I held on with all my strength. I could feel the ocean pulling my body in," says Rajan, who lost three of her friends that day.
 
After the wave receded, she started to swim back to the house through the dark water, to rejoin her family and friends. A second wave came crashing in. A friend was able to reach Rajan and help her climb to the top of another tree. "I was saved by two trees," she says. "It's a miracle I'm still alive."
 
Now, Rajan is looking for a million people to share their tree stories to raise awareness and money to restore the island nation's trees.
 
 
Rotary member Gowri Rajan waters a newly planted tree last December in the Kurunegala district of Sri Lanka.
Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of Gowri Rajan
 
 
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For more than 100 years, Rotary has united leaders committed to applying their expertise to better their communities. Despite over a century of impact in communities around the world, Rotary does not get the recognition it deserves.
 
We need to rethink how we tell our story so people everywhere understand what Rotary stands for, how we’re different, and why it matters. Recently, Rotary has embarked on a multiyear initiative of unprecedented scale to strengthen our image. In addition to expanding public understanding of what Rotary does, we want to motivate, engage, and inspire current and prospective members, donors, partners, and staff.
 
Rotary has a number of tools in order to help Rotarians spread the word about the good work that they do. One such tool is the messaging toolkit, available here. Below are some excerpts from it. If you have a Rotary story that you would like to share, then mention it in the comments below, and it may even be selected to be featured as a weekly meeting!
 
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As President-elect of the Rotary E-Club of One World, I will be traveling to Los Angeles later this month to attend the Southern California / Nevada Multi-District PETS (President Elect Training Seminar). PETS is the event, like the International Assembly for Governors-Elect, where incoming Rotary Club Presidents are trained to take the helm of their respective Rotary clubs to lead it for the next Rotary year. I look forward to a stronger engagement among our members and continuing the progress we have made under the leadership of President Susan.
 
During the coming year, Rotary clubs around the world will also be celebrating 100 years of Rotary "Doing Good in the World" through The Rotary Foundation (TRF). From its beginning in 1917 with the initial contribution of $26.50, 1913-14 RI President and TRF founder Arch C. Klumph declared that “we should accept endowments for the purpose of doing good in the world in charitable, educational, and other avenues of community service.” Since that modest beginning, Rotarians have contributed and TRF has distributed over three billion dollars to advance international understanding, goodwill and peace through its many programs and projects including ending polio worldwide.
 
In the following video, PRIP Ray Klinginsmith announces the Centennial Celebration and tells his personal experience as a product of The Rotary Foundation.

 
The Foundation Centennial Celebration
by Rotary Foundation Trustee Chair, PRIP Ray Klinginsmith
 
(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link: http://video.rotary.org/JMgH)
 
 
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Each year in January, around 530 Rotary District Governors-Elect representing 35,000 Rotary clubs and over 1.2 million Rotarians from around the world gather in San Diego, California, USA. At this week long event they meet the Rotary International President-Elect, prepare for their year to lead their respective Rotary districts and share Rotary at the International Assembly. Rotary's annual training meeting gives incoming district governors the chance to share ideas for strengthening clubs and improving communities with Rotary leaders from around the world.
 
Keynote speakers and informative presentations will inspire them and prepare them to lead their district successfully. Idea exchanges, roundtable discussions, and workshops will lead them to new ways of creating positive change.
 
The following brief video summarizes what incoming governors can expect to see and do at the International Assembly. (Click on "Read more..." below to expand & continue).
 
(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link: https://vimeo.com/27639343)
 
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"Remembering No More: A Story of Change - Life in the Carolinas Alzheimer's Special" is a segment of Carl White's Life in the Carolinas, which first aired November 21, 2015.

In this special episode, Carl explores Alzheimer's Disease. Focusing on the story of Vera, a gracious lady who suffers with Alzheimer's, he explores the disease, how it impacts on patients and those who love the patients, and the efforts of the many men and women who are working to eradicate this devastating disease.
 
(If you cannot see the video below, you can reach it through the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJpS091Vsso&feature=youtu.be)
 
 
 
Roger Ackerman, Rotary Member in Sumter SC Rotary Club, is the founder of C.A.R.T., or Coins for Alzheimer's Research Trust. He discusses, with great emotion and affection, his mother-in-law's struggle with Alzheimer's, and how her suffering inspired him to explore ways to fight this disease. By emptying their spare change before each meeting, his club soon collected several thousand dollars. This seed grew. Today they provide millions of dollars for seed grant funding of Alzheimer's research. Bill Shillito is the Executive Director of the C.A.R.T Fund. 1580 clubs and growing in the region contribute to the fund.
 
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In Tamil Nadu, India, two doctors, both members of the Rotary Club of Srirangam, discovered an alarming trend in the remote city outskirts of Trichy, women dying of breast cancer.
 
Maryland, USA, Rotary members Christopher Puttock and Rachel Blair (left), pay a visit to the Mammobus last year to check on the project’s status. With them are Dr. K.N. Srinivasan (far right) and Mrs. Vijayalakshmi, who coordinates the bus’s schedule for the K Shantha Breast Cancer Foundation.
Courtesy of Rotary Club of Srirangam
 
 
Drs. K. Govindaraj and K.N. Srinivasan knew that much of the death and suffering could be avoided, and both were motivated by their personal experiences with the disease. Govindaraj watched his mother die of breast cancer a decade earlier, and helped found the Dr. K. Shantha Breast Cancer Foundation in her memory.  Srinivasan, an oncologist, witnessed unprecedented growth in the number of younger patients coming to his clinic with advanced stages of the disease.
 
According to the National Cancer Registry of India, 20 to 40 women per 100,000 are suffering from breast cancer.  And because many women lack the resources to travel to the city, or the $50 fee for proper screening , the doctors needed a unique approach. During a trip to South Korea, Govindaraj saw a large van outfitted with X-ray equipment parked outside a mall, and thought a moving doctor’s office and lab -- or “mammobus” -- could overcome the challenges they faced.
 
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Earlier this past year, Rotary announced that it has formalized its service partnership with the Peace Corps. As a member of Rotary E-Club of One World, you now have additional opportunities to connect with international and community service projects where you live.
 
Peace Corps, an independent U.S. federal agency, sends U/S. citizens abroad to help tackle the most pressing needs around the world while promoting international goodwill. Peace Corps Volunteers live and work alongside the people they support for a period of two or more years. They concentrate efforts to create sustainable change that lives on long after their period of in-country service. Peace Corps currently has volunteers in more than 60 countries.

"Today's announcement is particularly meaningful for me because I come from a family of Rotarians," said Peace Corps Acting Director, Carrie Hessler-Radelet, referring to her father, grandfather, and aunt. "We are eager to join together in common efforts to inspire volunteerism across the country and around the world."
 
At the signing of the agreement, Rotary International General Secretary John Hewko said, “It makes perfect sense to leverage the strengths of both organizations to achieve maximum impact, efficiency and sustainability in the projects we carry out. Together we will work to improve lives and build stronger communities, and – in doing so – address many of the root causes of violence and conflict, such as poverty, illiteracy, disease, and lack of access to clean water and sanitation.”
 
 
John Osterlund (far left) and Ron Burton watch as Peace Corps Acting Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet and Rotary International General Secretary John Hewko sign a letter of collaboration on a one-year pilot program in the Philippines, Thailand, and Togo.
Photo Credit: Rotary International/Alyce Henson
 
 
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Year’s end is a natural time of reflection, and in my family we take time out to think about what is just past and what the future might hold. This year we will have something more to discuss having happened upon the TED video below.

 
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World Peace has seemed pretty elusive lately.  We pray for peace, we tweet for peace, we visualize peace, and yet it fails to materialize.  

 

John Hunter, a teacher in Albemarle, Virginia, has put his hope for world peace in the hands of his fourth-grade classes.  In 1978, Hunter began his teaching career and over the course of it has developed the World Peace Game. Each year since the game’s inception, his students have worked together to solve the problems that lead to conflict. 

 
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As an e-club, we are involved in a grand Rotary experiment, though on a day-to-day basis we hardly think of it that way.  I was reminded of this in watching two TED talks recently, neither of which has to do with Rotary per se, but both started a chain of thinking about Rotary nonetheless. 

 
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Hurricane Mama, as the Walt Disney Concert Hall pipe organ is affectionately called, was completed in 2004.  It caused a sensation in musical circles with its radical design, but skepticism was silenced by the tone, range, subtlety and power of this magnificent instrument.
 
 
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For the month of December, we will be sharing stories of great Rotary projects being done around the globe. This week, we are highlighting Computers for the World, a Rotary district 5030 District program that has been running for over 15 years. When I was an Ambassadorial Scholar in Montevideo, Uruguay, I worked with C4W to bring over 200 workstations to install in schools, community centers, and orphanages across Uruguay. It made a huge impact on the lives of those who gained computer skills, but also on the lives of the students who came to Uruguay to install the computers. Below is a excerpt from the website with more information about the program, as well as a short video that talks about the great project work being done in Antigua.

 

If you have a Rotary story you want to share, please email it to me.

 
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It was 1952, and polio gripped the world in fear. There was no known cause, no cure and no help in sight for parents desperate to protect their children. Across the ocean, eager to beat the potentially fatal condition, polio-afflicted President Roosevelt inspired the American public to send in their dimes to fund research.

In just a few years Joseph Salk, an ambitious 33-year-old scientist working from his basement lab in Pittsburgh, would bring infantile paralysis to its knees and change the course of medical history. World-renowned experts and survivors tell the extraordinary story of how Dr Salk and the legendary 'march of dimes' came together to help conquer polio.